A Distant Holla (Chapter 1)

Daniel Minter, American, born 1961

Share

2018

Acrylic and metal on wood

Overall: 54 × 40 × 5 in. (137.2 × 101.6 × 12.7 cm)

Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth: Purchased through the Julia L. Whittier Fund and a gift from Judith Liff Barker & Joseph N. Barker '66

© Daniel Minter

2022.54

Geography

Place Imaged: United States, North America

Period

21st century

Object Name

Sculpture

Research Area

Sculpture

Mixed Media

On view

Label

Tucked in the far-left corner, a small painting of a red rooster references a nursery rhyme often recited by the artist’s parents: “Good morning captain rooster, I’ve come to borrow your wings, to fly across the ocean, to hear Miss Lucy sing.” This rooster represents spiritual linkages between Black people living in diaspora and the African continent.

According to the artist, the idea of flying over the Atlantic emphasizes the infinite possibilities of Black people “accessing all of the energies we still have and may not even know we have.” These energies coalesce with four small glass jars arranged in the shape of a cross. One contains water, representing life and spiritual cleansing. For Minter, these vessels and containers represent spaces of safe keeping, “Ever since we have been here, everything that we have was meant to be taken, even our bodies. To have places to keep things, to hold things, that’s how we survive.”

From the 2023 exhibition Liquidity: Art, Commodities, and Water, curated by Michael Hartman, Jonathan Little Cohen Associate Curator of American Art

Course History

First Year Student Enrichment Program - Cultures, Identities and Belongings, Francine A'Ness, Summer 2023

Exhibition History

Liquidity: Art, Commodities, and Water, Israel Sack Gallery and the Rush Family Gallery, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, July 29, 2023-June 16, 2024.

Provenance

Judy and Noah Liff Foundation, Nashville, Tennessee; sold to present collection, 2022.

This record is part of an active database that includes information from historic documentation that may not have been recently reviewed. Information may be inaccurate or incomplete. We also acknowledge some language and imagery may be offensive, violent, or discriminatory. These records reflect the institution’s history or the views of artists or scholars, past and present. Our collections research is ongoing.

We welcome questions, feedback, and suggestions for improvement. Please contact us at: Hood.Collections@dartmouth.edu