Pacific Diaspora Kin

Coyote Park, 2Spirit / Korean / German / Yurok / American

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2022

Color photograph on paper

Image: 24 1/8 × 36 1/4 in. (61.3 × 92 cm)

Sheet: 25 1/16 × 37 3/16 in. (63.7 × 94.4 cm)

Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth: Purchased through the Anonymous Fund #144

© Coyote Park

2023.7.4

Geography

Place Made: United States, North America

Period

21st century

Object Name

Photograph

Research Area

Photograph

Not on view

Inscriptions

none

Label

This self portrait of the artist and members of their kin tells a story of homecoming. Whether home be among chosen family, within one’s body, within one’s gender, or united with nature, Pacific Diaspora Kin celebrates the sanctity and ceremony of Indigenous peoples coming home to their traditional ways. Through depicting himself nude and nestled on a hillside, the artist expresses kinship and relationality with the natural world. Intertwined and bathed in a golden light, Coyote makes place for healing by documenting and preserving the joy, divinity, and lucidity that result from being in community with nature. Sharing space, story, and memory restores harmony to us and all our relations.

From the 2023 exhibition Love as Ceremony: Legacies of Two-Spirit Liberation, A Space for Dialogue 114, curated by Moonoka Begay '23, Conroy Intern

Course History

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 2.01, Introduction to Queer Studies, Eng-Beng Lim, Summer 2023

English 31.01, Asian American Literature and Culture, Jodi Kim, Fall 2023

Exhibition History

A Space for Dialogue 114, Love as Ceremony: Legacies of Two-Spirit Liberation, Moonoka Begay, '23, Alvin P. Gutman Gallery, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, 19 August - 14 October 2023.

Provenance

The artist, Coyote Park; sold to present collection, 2023.

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