We are expanding! Check out our programming while the museum is closed.

News

March 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, spring 2013
Stacey Sell ’85, Associate Curator of Old Master Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

The Hood recently received two major gifts from the family of Adolph Weil Jr., Class of 1935, and his wife, Jean K. Weil. Albrecht Dürer’s engraving Saint Jerome in His Study  (1514) and Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn’s etching The Three...

Read more.
September 1, 2012
Will Owen and Harvey Wagner at the opening of Crossing Cultures

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2012
Stephen Gilchrist, Curator of Indigenous Australian Art

For Aboriginal people from Australia, the land has always been the symbolic bedrock of cultural knowledge. The shapeshifting Ancestors who created the land, named it, and passed down the laws of social behavior on epic journeys eventually metamorphosed into the earth and vested it with their power. These narratives are reconstituted through ceremonial performances and cultural art production to ensure the wellbeing of the...

Read more.
September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

The estate of Evelyn Stefannson Nef recently made a bequest of two whalebone sculptures by the Inuit artist Karoo Ashevak to the Hood Museum of Art. Hailed as the most innovative and important Inuit sculptor of his generation, Ashevak was born in 1940 and lived in Taloyoak, Nunavut (formerly Spence Bay, Northwest Territories), the northernmost community on the...

Read more.
September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

This past year, along with many generous individual donations of works of art, the Hood Museum of Art received a number of significant group gifts. These works from patrons and donors will add significantly to both our contemporary and our photography collections. In addition to the gifts listed here, we also received a gift of five works from the Sam...

Read more.
March 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2011
Barbara J. MacAdam,  Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

During the past twenty-five years, Jack Huber, Dartmouth Class of 1963, and his wife, Russell, have built a distinguished collection of American art from the turn of the twentieth century, an era characterized by dramatic social, cultural, and artistic change. Dating from roughly 1885 to 1920, the works in this exhibition represent a...

Read more.
September 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2010-11
25th Anniversary Issue
Joe Horse Capture, Associate Curator of Native American Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and guest curator of the exhibition

The Hood Museum of Art has recently acquired a large group of drawings created by the Native American tribes of the Great Plains region. Through partial gift and purchase, this acquisition makes the Hood one of the largest repositories of ledger drawings in an art museum in the country....

Read more.
March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

Harry T. Lewis Jr., Dartmouth Class of 1955, has made the generous gift of Allan Houser’s Taza, a major bronze sculpture cast from a piece originally carved in Indiana limestone in 1991. This is the second important gift of a Houser sculpture by a Dartmouth alumnus in recent years, following the 2007 gift of the large-scale bronze Peaceful Serenity (1992) by...

Read more.
March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

This bronze relief by the renowned American realist Thomas Eakins (below) is an ecorché—a depiction that shows the muscles of a body without skin. In a tradition dating back at least to the Renaissance and widely adopted in French academies in the nineteenth century, such renderings served as important tools in teaching anatomy. This expertly modeled relief depicts Josephine, a beloved mare who belonged to...

Read more.
March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

Frans Hals, an early-seventeenth-century Dutch painter, specialized in portraiture; his great success in Haarlem brought him many commissions. He was renowned for his portrayals of prominent civic groups and wealthy individuals.

Hals’s loose style and vivid brushwork created a more spontaneous appearance than that of the work of many of his contemporaries; this imbued his paintings with a lively and direct manner. The innovative...

Read more.
September 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2009-10

At the close of the Hood Museum of Art’s recent exhibition Immanence and Revelation: The Art of Ben Frank Moss, the artist and several members of his family generously donated nine paintings and drawings that had been featured in the exhibition and...

Read more.

Pages

Close
Hood Museum