We are expanding! Check out our programming while the museum is closed.

News

January 1, 2007

Climate and Weather within the Context of Inuit Life and Traditions

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007
Nicole S. Tuckenberger, Stefansson Postdoctoral Fellow, Curator of Thin Ice: Inuit Traditions within a Changing Environment

The Arctic is home to about four million people, both indigenous and more recently arrived from the south—living in towns or on the land as hunters, fishermen, herders or, most commonly, some combination of all three. The Arctic indigenous peoples have distinct but...

Read more.
September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

Caché is a powerful life-sized sculpture by Alison Saar, who was artist-in-residence in Dartmouth College’s Department of Studio Art in 2002. This work presents an autobiographical narrative layered with African and African American artistic and cultural references.

Caché is composed of a carved wooden figure of a reclining female nude swathed...

Read more.
September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

Henry “Mike” Bannarn was an influential, academically trained artist intimately associated with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1930s. In addition to his art, which was widely exhibited and admired in his day, he was revered for his role as a mentor to other African American artists. Together with fellow artist Charles Alston, he ran a studio/workshop at 306 West 141st Street (dubbed “306”), which served not only as a...

Read more.
June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004
Kevin Perry ’04, Megan Fontanella ’04, and Jennifer Schreck ’04, Hood Museum of Art interns

This winter, Kevin Perry ’04, public relations intern, interviewed Megan Fontanella ’04, Class of 1954 intern, and Jennifer Schreck ’04, part-time special projects intern, about the exhibition they curated during their senior year. The show features the work of over two dozen photographers, all of them women, from the permanent collection of the Hood.

KEVIN: Why...

Read more.
June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004
Roberto Tejada, Assistant Professor, Art History, Theory, and Criticism, Visual Arts Department, University of California, San Diego, and co-curator of the exhibition

Luis Gispert is an image-maker in the comprehensive sense of the word. Loud Image presents a broad range of his works—photographic, time-based, and sculptural—with the aim of prompting a conversation between them in order to...

Read more.
June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004

Beginning in the 1930s, Isabel Bishop captured in her art the ordinary, fleeting gestures of city inhabitants as observed on the streets and public conveyances of Manhattan. Like her fellow “Fourteenth Street School” artists, including Reginald Marsh, she used a lively, reportorial style to convey the bustling street life around this commercial downtown neighborhood. Bishop brought an especially intimate regard to her numerous images of female office workers chatting on street corners, striding confidently along the sidewalks, or stopping to pull...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

An Interview with Hugh Davies, The David C. Copley Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director, Hood Museum of Art, and Hugh Davies, The David C. Copley Director, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Interview conducted September 17, 2003

Lateral Thinking: Art of the 1990s is a deep survey of vanguard representational practices from the preceding decade, all drawn from the permanent collection of the Museum of Contemporary...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Last year, Alison Saar was the Artist-in-Residence at Dartmouth College. In conjunction with that prestigious role, an impressive exhibition of Saar’s sculptures and prints was held by the Studio Art Exhibition Program in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries in Hopkins Center (April 1–May 4, 2003). During this period, she further contributed to the vital cultural life of the college by informally advising the Studio Art Department’s undergraduate majors,...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Contemporary artist Kara Walker is known for her highly charged silhouetted visual narratives of masters and slaves in the pre–Civil War South. One of her primary artistic themes is the sexual domination of female black slaves by white masters; through images of these graphic violations, she evokes the enormity of the crime committed against enslaved Africans and their descendents.

This sensitively...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Terry Adkins was the Artist-in-Residence at Dartmouth College during the summer of 2003. A memorable exhibition of his work took place in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries in Hopkins Center at that time, and Still (2000) was a centerpiece of that project.

Adkins is a well-respected sculptor whose installations and assemblages are characterized by a profound sensitivity to found objects and a deep, highly personal appreciation for African American history. This alluring floor piece combines...

Read more.

Pages

Close
Hood Museum