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The museum is presently closed for expansion and renovation. It will reopen on January 26, 2019. Enjoy the museum's collection of public art on view throughout Dartmouth's campus.

Upcoming Events

Hood Downtown Celebration and New Museum Preview

13 September, Thursday, 6:00-8:00 pm
Hood Downtown
Bid a fond farewell to Hood Downtown and enjoy a special presentation that will provide a look at what is to come in the new museum, including a preview of the newly installed galleries and a peek at life behind the scenes of the reinstallation project. Enjoy live music, refreshments, and giveaways as we begin the countdown to the reopening of the museum. Remarks at 7:00 pm.

The Manton Foundation Annual Orozco Lecture

11 October, Thursday, 5:00-6:00 pm
Carpenter Hall 013
“White Zombies and Black Labor: Specters of Slavery and Rebellion in José Clemente Orozco’s Epic of American Civilization”
Mary Coffey, Associate Professor of Art History, Dartmouth
Orozco’s Epic of American Civilization provides a powerful critique of the conquest and colonization of the Americas. And yet it makes no mention of the institution of slavery in the formation of its modern nation-states. In this talk, Mary Coffey will address this silence and offer speculative readings of the Epic that speak to the specters of slavery and rebellion that haunt the mural. She will pay particular attention to Orozco’s vision of the “Two Americas,” as well as to the “Modern Industrial Man,” asking what possibilities are opened up by reading him as a person of African descent. We will walk over to the mural cycle for a Q&A at the end of the lecture.

Public Art

Our National Historic Landmark

Orozco’s American Epic: Myth, History, and Racial Melancholy will soon be published as the first monograph devoted exclusively to José Clemente Orozco’s mural cycle The Epic of American Civilization. The book is penned by Dartmouth’s Mary Coffey, professor of art history, who is also this year’s speaker for the Manton Foundation Annual Orozco Lecture. Through her publication, Coffey explores the history of violence that founds the modern nationstate in the Americas. She argues that Orozco’s mural is an artifact of the artist’s border-crossing, which shifted his understanding of race and national identity in both Mexico and the United States. Watch for the forthcoming book through Duke University Press and learn more about these issues at Professor Coffey’s lecture on October 11.

Download a PDF of the Orozco mural brochure.

Download a PDF of the museum's redesigned public art walking guide.