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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007

Most attempts at establishing American glass factories during the colonial period were short-lived, generally because they could not compete with the imports from England, Ireland, and central Europe that made up the vast majority of the glassware used in the colonies. This flask, which is mold-blown in a distinctive diamond daisy pattern, represents one of the few forms that can be confidently attributed to the glassworks of Henry William Stiegel (...

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March 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Brian Kennedy, Director

Although Jackson Pollock, like many great artists, was always reluctant to reveal any artistic influences on his work, it has long been known that he was powerfully affected by the Mexican muralists Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and José Clemente Orozco. Scholars had suggested over the years that Pollock must have seen the extraordinary mural cycle The Epic of American Civilization, which was painted...

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March 1, 2007
Subhankar Banerjee, Caribou Migration I, 2002, UltraChrome print. Purchased through the Charles F. Venrick 1936 Fund; 2006.61

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Katherine Hart, Associate Director and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

Five years ago, Subhankar Banerjee spent almost two years in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, photographing this remote region in northeastern Alaska in all four seasons. His work there coincided with the push by oil companies and the current U.S. administration to open up the oil and gas reserves on the coastal plain to drilling. During his travels over nearly four thousand miles of the 19.5-million-acre...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Kristin Monahan Garcia, Curatorial Assistant for Academic and Student Programming

Pilobolus, the dance group that emerged from a Dartmouth classroom in 1971, has toured worldwide in the thirty-five years since its founding, created an institute of educational programming, launched touring companies, and profoundly influenced the world of contemporary dance. Now they have come home again.

The company’s spring visit to the College celebrates the donation of the Pilobolus archives to the Dartmouth College...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

Gamin is the best-known work by Augusta Savage, the most admired and influential woman artist associated with the Harlem Renaissance. The life-size bronze version of this work (Schomburg Center, New York Public Library) won Savage the opportunity to study in Paris from 1929 to 1931.

Although Gamin has invoked for viewers the ubiquitous street boys of Harlem, Savage actually modeled the sculpture after her nephew and fellow Harlem resident Ellis Ford, who had earned...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the making of samplers gave girls and young women the opportunity to practice a variety of embroidery stitches and to reinforce rudimentary lessons in spelling and penmanship.

This colorful, finely worked example by sixteen-year-old Apphia Amanda Young is typical of the samplers made in the vicinity of Canterbury, New Hampshire, from 1786 until at least 1838, the date of this work, which is the latest dated Canterbury example known. It...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

Nunavut—“our land” in Inuktitut, the Inuit language—is the region of Canada that encompasses the area around Hudson Bay, west of Greenland. It was created in 1999 as part of a land claim settlement with the Canadian government by the region’s native people, who call themselves Inuit, “the people.” This remarkable transfer of land, the first in Canada in over fifty years, separated Nunavut from the Northwest Territories. Our Land includes sculptures, prints, textiles,...

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January 1, 2007

Dartmouth Arctic Collections and the International Polar Year, 2007–8

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007
Ross A. Virginia, Director, Dickey Center Institute of Arctic Studies, Professor of Environmental Studies, Dartmouth College; Kenneth S. Yalowitz, Ambassador (Ret.) Director, Dickey Center for International Understanding, Adjunct Professor of Government, Dartmouth College; Gor Krupnik, Curator, Circumpolar Ethnology, Arctic Studies Center, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

...

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January 1, 2007

Climate and Weather within the Context of Inuit Life and Traditions

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007
Nicole S. Tuckenberger, Stefansson Postdoctoral Fellow, Curator of Thin Ice: Inuit Traditions within a Changing Environment

The Arctic is home to about four million people, both indigenous and more recently arrived from the south—living in towns or on the land as hunters, fishermen, herders or, most commonly, some combination of all three. The Arctic indigenous peoples have distinct but...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

This beautifully carved and painted wooden mask by the Tongass Tlingit artist Norman G. Jackson brings to light a contemporary reinterpretation of traditional Northwest Coast themes and mythical stories. In much Northwest Coast art, painted, carved, or woven imagery is used during special occasions to proclaim and validate the status of ancestral clan crests representing mythical beings.

Jackson depicts the important mythic being Sharkman, who...

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