We are expanding! Check out our programming while the museum is closed.

Native America

Spirit of the Basket Tree: Wabanaki Ash Splint Baskets from Maine

Hood Quarterly, winter 2009
Jennifer Sapiel Neptune (Penobscot)

Recent Acquisitions: Pam outdusis Cunningham, Fancy Basket, 2007

Allan Houser's Peaceful Serenity is Installed on Campus

Hood Quarterly, winter 2008

On October 7, 2007, President James Wright, the Native American Studies Program at Dartmouth College, and the Hood Museum of Art joined guests for the unveiling of an Allan Houser (1914–1994) sculpture, Peaceful Serenity (1992), in front of the Sherman House. This bronze-plated sculpture was recently acquired by the Hood Museum of Art through the generosity of Mary Alice Kean Raynolds and David R. W. Raynolds ’49.

Recent Acquisitions: Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie, Photographic Memoirs of an Aboriginal Savant, 1994

The Mark Lansburgh Collection

Hood Quarterly, winter 2008
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

Recent Acquisitions: Preston Singletary, Tlingit Crest Hat, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Traditionally, Northwest coast Native peoples made crest hats of cedar bark decorated with formline designs that were painted onto the wood with black, red, or green dyes. These abstract designs still assert ancestral lineages linking family members to specific animal or nature spirits.

Recent Acquisitions: Victor Masayesva Jr., Ground Zero, 1998/2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Victor Masayesva Jr., who grew up on a Hopi Reservation in Hotevilla, Arizona, incorporates Hopi symbolism into his photography to depict the ruptured balance between humans and nature. Using antlers, flower petals, feathers, snake skins, cornstalks, and bones as visual metaphors for the cycle of life and death, Masayesva juxtaposes the destruction of humans, animals, land, and spirit against the reality of regeneration, life, and beauty in the southwestern landscape.

No Laughing Matter: Visual Humor in Ideas of Race, Nationality, and Ethnicity

Recent Acquisitions: Nicholas Galanin, What Have We Become? Vol. 3 & 5a, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007

Nicholas Galanin, an emerging Tlingit artist, constructs enigmatic sculptures of masklike faces from blank sheets and pages from nineteenth-century anthropological books as part of a series of paper sculptures addressing the politics of cultural representation and contemporary indigenous identity. The materiality of the sculptures is significant to him.

Our Land: Contemporary Art from the Arctic

Pages

Close
Hood Museum