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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008

American painter, photographer, and printmaker Ben Shahn (1898–1969) is known for his poignant, often strident images that point to social and political injustices. According to the artist, his inspiration for this print of New York skyscrapers under construction was the personal pain he experienced upon “seeing the city I grew up in...

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January 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, winter 2008

During the 1930s and 1940s Grace Albee (1890–1985) established her reputation as a highly skilled regionalist printmaker. Among her many awards and honors, she was the first female graphic artist ever to receive full membership in the National Academy of Design. She began to work seriously in wood engraving while she lived with her husband and five sons in Paris from 1928 to 1933. After moving in 1937 to a farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, she focused on the rural subjects for...

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January 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, winter 2008

Rome was the European center for bronze sculpture production throughout the baroque era. The precise identity of the individual responsible for the design and execution of this noteworthy statue remains unknown, but the remarkable quality indicates someone well-versed in the Roman artistic traditions of this period. It bears the distinctive facial characteristics of St. Francis Borgia (1510–1572), the third Father General of the Jesuits, who was...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

The Hood is delighted to have received from Hanover resident Philip H. Greene a gift of thirteen paintings that represent the vitality of the “California-style” watercolorists. This informal but closely knit group of artists was most active from the late 1920s through the 1950s, primarily in...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

From four generations of photographers, Lotte Jacobi took over her father’s Berlin photographic studio in 1927. She became one of the best-known photographers in Germany, particularly noted for her portraits of celebrities and artists. In 1935 she was forced to flee Nazi Germany and opened a studio and gallery in New York City, where she continued to pursue portraiture while freelancing as a photographer for Life magazine.

Here, in a...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

The acquisition of the first Degas print to enter the collection was generously funded by the Lathrop Fellows. Degas’s On Stage III was one of only four prints published during the artist’s lifetime. It was created for an exhibition sponsored by Les Amis des Arts de Pau, a town in southern France, where he had several friends. The etching reveals Degas’s exploration of a favorite early vantage point at the Opéra, the center seats behind the...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Charles Fairfax Murray was a close associate of Edward Burne-Jones (1833– 1898), one of the leading so-called Pre-Raphaelite artists active in England in the late nineteenth century. They advocated a revival of interest in medieval art and subject matter, a rebellion against conventional ideas and academic styles, and an assertion of the importance of emotion over intellect.

Murray’s composition of The Triumph of Love is loosely...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007
Brian Kennedy, Director

For the last six years, the Hood Museum of Art has given the walls in its entrance lobby to its senior student interns for mini-exhibitions drawn from the museum’s collections.There have been thirty-eight of these exhibitions since they were first inaugurated by then-director Derrick Cartwright in 2001. Gathered under the title A Space for...

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June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004
Katherine Hart, Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

The Hood Museum of Art’s Lathrop Gallery is dedicated to showing modern and contemporary works from the collection in honor of Churchill P. Lathrop and his wife, Dorothy. Churchill Lathrop was an early member of the college’s art department and a longstanding advocate of modern and contemporary art during his years at Dartmouth. With his colleague Artemas Packard, Churchill Lathrop created the college’s...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

In mid-nineteenth-century America, drawing was an important skill enjoyed by many amateur women and schoolgirls, particularly those privileged to study at private female academies. Along with music, needlework, and fine penmanship, the ability to draw conveyed one’s proper education and appreciation for beauty—qualities highly valued in a prospective wife, mother, or future teacher.

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to have received as a gift from Professor of Theater Margaret E. Spicer a collection of delightful mid-nineteenth-century...

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