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Recent Acquisitions

Recent Acquisitions: Jennifer Steinkamp, Judy Crook 9, 2017

Artist Jennifer Steinkamp’s digital animation Judy Crook 9 introduces images of nature into architectural spaces in a manner that complicates the idea of inside and outside, and built versus natural environments. It takes the viewer through four seasons in one tree’s life—repeated endlessly to simultaneously evoke the cyclical nature of life and the ideal of infinite existence. Steinkamp has been making works of digital art that honor her art teachers over the years.

The Collections

Archive of Photographer James Nachtwey ’70 Acquired by Hood Museum

by Dartmouth's Office of Communications

The more than 500,000 images document conditions in the world’s most dangerous places.

The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth has acquired the complete archive of award-winning photojournalist and war photographer James Nachtwey ’70, who has spent more than 35 years documenting conditions in some of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

Alumni Voices: James Nachtwey, Class of 1970

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2016

Senior Curator of Collections and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming Katherine Hart sent James Nachtwey a series of questions upon the completion of the museum’s acquisition of his life’s work. Here are his replies.

Dartmouth Acquires Complete Archive of Acclaimed Photojournalist James Nachtwey

Spring 2016 Museum Collecting 101

by Eva Munday '16, Hood Programming Class of 1954 Intern

Recent Acquisitions: Lyman, Fenton & Co. / United States Pottery Co., Pair of Lions, about 1849–58

Recent Acquisitions: Alma Woodsey Thomas, Wind Dancing with Spring Flowers, 1969

Recent Acquisitions: Attributed to William Hart, Tannery in the Catskills, about early 1850s

Recent Acquisitions: Kiki Smith, Hoarfrost with Rabbit, 2014

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2015

Kiki Smith, Hoarfrost with Rabbit [now titled Refuge], 2014, stainless steel

I trust my work. It’s a collaboration with the material, and when it’s viewed, it’s a collaboration with the world. What your work is resides in between those different spaces.
—Kiki Smith, 2005


Hood Museum