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Quarterly

Recent Acquisitions: Kara Walker, L’il Patch of Woods, 1997

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Contemporary artist Kara Walker is known for her highly charged silhouetted visual narratives of masters and slaves in the pre–Civil War South. One of her primary artistic themes is the sexual domination of female black slaves by white masters; through images of these graphic violations, she evokes the enormity of the crime committed against enslaved Africans and their descendents.

Made for the Hood Museum of Art: Alison Saar, Inheritance

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

A Year of Encountering Contemporary Art at the Hood

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director

Lateral Thinking: A Director’s Viewpoint

An Interview with Hugh Davies, The David C. Copley Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director, Hood Museum of Art, and Hugh Davies, The David C. Copley Director, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Interview conducted September 17, 2003

Letter from the Director: Winter 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director

2003 NEMA Publications Awards

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Recent Acquisitions: A Gift of mid-19th century American Drawings

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

In mid-nineteenth-century America, drawing was an important skill enjoyed by many amateur women and schoolgirls, particularly those privileged to study at private female academies. Along with music, needlework, and fine penmanship, the ability to draw conveyed one’s proper education and appreciation for beauty—qualities highly valued in a prospective wife, mother, or future teacher.

Recent Acquisitions: Mary Cassatt, Drawing for “Evening,” 1879/80

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Recent Acquisitions: Louis-Léopold Boilly, Young Woman Reading in a Landscape, 1798

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Louis-Léopold Boilly (1761–1845) first established his reputation as an accomplished portraitist and genre painter at the Paris Salon exhibitions during the French Revolution (1789–99). The painting that brought him his greatest success was the Gathering of Artists in Isabey’s Studio exhibited in the 1798 Salon (and now in the Musée du Louvre).

Recent Acquisitions: Chief Killer, Central Plains, Cheyenne, School at Fort Marion, about 1877–78

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

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