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September 1, 2014
Kiki Smith, My Blue Lake, 1995, photogravure, à la poupée inkling, and lithograph in 3 colors on mold made En Tout Cas paper. © 1994 Kiki Smith/Universal Limited Art Editions

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

Kiki Smith is among the most admired and significant American artists of her generation. As a feminist artist and activist, she has created a large number of highly memorable sculptures, drawings, collages, and prints in which the human body is imbued with political significance. Smith has often used her own face and body as material for her work, and this practice continues in My Blue Lake, her most important...

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September 1, 2014
Soldiers and Students, 1962, opaque watercolor over graphite on wove paper

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014
Michael Taylor, Director

I am pleased to begin this letter by sharing that on June 12, 2014, Dartmouth College announced an anonymous gift of $10 million to create a new Museum Learning Center as a pivotal element of the Hood Museum of Art’s forthcoming $50 million renovation and expansion. The Museum Learning Center will triple the number of...

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September 1, 2014
Jacob Lawrence, Soldiers and Students

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

Fifty years ago, the Congress of the United States passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The bill came before the Senate in February 1964, survived a fifty-four–day filibuster, and was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2. The struggle for racial equality had been waged for decades, and it continued to be fought throughout the 1960s. Visual artists mounted their own...

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September 1, 2014
Earl Shaw, Charles Day, Jim Simmons

Three Perspectives

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

In preparation for presenting Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties, the Hood Museum staff and interns conducted focus groups with current Dartmouth students to learn how they wanted to engage with the exhibition’s themes. Student feedback helped to shape our presentation of, and programming for, Witness. The students particularly wanted to learn about what was...

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September 1, 2014
selma march

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014
Amelia Kahl, Coordinator of Academic Programming

I was drawn to that specific image because the Hood’s collection includes many civil rights-era pieces, but few of them actually illustrate what civil rights activism looked like. Karales’s photo, with other Karales photos in the series, provides a context for the rest of the Hood’s civil rights collection. Since our group had the opportunity to visit the galleries from which we were evaluating photographs, I’m happy to say...

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September 1, 2014
Dick Steinberg

Richard “Dick” Steinberg, Class of 1954, Tuck 1955

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

In March of this year, we lost a dear friend and patron of the Hood Museum of Art, Richard “Dick” Steinberg, Class of 1954, Tuck 1955. Dick’s passion for art was ignited during his years at Dartmouth, while studying in the Reserve Room of Baker Library, home to José Clemente Orozco’s 1932–34 mural The Epic of American Civilization. When he learned that the museum was mounting an exhibition on Orozco and his...

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September 1, 2014
Mickey and his wife Leila

Melville “Mickey” Straus, Class of 1960

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

A great friend and benefactor to Dartmouth and the Hood Museum of Art, Melville “Mickey” Straus, Class of 1960 passed away in May of this year. Passionate about the arts and an avid collector of mid-century modern and contemporary art, Mickey was a longtime member of the museum’s Lathrop Fellow patron group, and he actively embraced the museum’s teaching mission and supported it in myriad ways. He also helped bring a number of...

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September 1, 2014
JessicaWomackSFDtalk.2.28.14%20%287%29.jpg

Reaching People with Alzheimer's and Dementia through Art

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

Today a growing number of museums across the country are offering special tours and programs for people who have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The Hood took this important step in 2006, inspired by two pioneering institutions—the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Museum of Modern Art. Both museums’ programs revealed that engagement with the visual arts has a positive effect on people with...

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September 1, 2014
inventory_6.jpg

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

V12 Laraki (2013) is the most important work to date by the African-born Belgian artist Eric van Hove. This stunning sculpture brings together Western industrial tradition, rep- resented in the car engine, and more than a thousand years of craftsmanship heritage of the Maghreb region in Africa. Created in collaboration with 43 talented craftsmen from across Morocco who worked consistently for nine months, the work...

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September 1, 2014
Abastenia St. Leger Eberle, Hurdy Gurdy Dancer

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

Abastenia St. Leger Eberle (1878–1942) is best known for having created animated sculptures that reflect her interest in the everyday lives of immigrants in New York’s Lower East Side. She was particularly drawn to female subjects, especially young girls at play. In Hurdy Gurdy, which she modeled around 1909, Eberle rejected the static forms and grand subjects she had been exposed to at New York’s Art Students...

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