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April 17, 2015
River Wandjina, 2004, gelatin silver print

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Water is ubiquitous in our lives. We use it for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and recreation. It affects where we choose to live and is integral to many people’s work. This exhibition explores water’s impact on human life and humanity’s impact on water.

Drawn primarily from the Hood’s permanent collection, the exhibition comprises over two dozen works from across the globe. The majority are 20th– and...

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April 17, 2015
Dartmouth’s introductory French II class works in the exhibition About Face

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Organized in collaboration with nine Dartmouth students, About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art explores the extraordinary range and global diversity of self-portraiture in contemporary art. Building on the success of recent student-driven Hood exhibitions, such as The Expanding Grid and...

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April 16, 2015
Bird with Spread Wings

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

The Hood Museum of Art possesses over twelve hundred works by Native American artists from the Arctic and Subarctic regions of Canada, Alaska, and Greenland. A new installation now on view in the Kim Gallery showcases these collections, highlighting in particular two important recent gifts to the collection. In 2011, Jane and Raphael Bernstein donated nearly forty prints, drawings, and sculptures, as well as numerous...

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March 1, 2015

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015
Juliette Bianco, Interim Director

All visitors to the Hood Museum of Art are confronted, and most often awed, by the magnificent ninth-century BCE stone carvings in Kim Gallery from the ancient city of Nimrud that depict the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II, attended by both human and supernatural protectors. These objects—just six out of the nearly 65,000 that are preserved in the museum’s collection—are treasured by all who behold them as a direct link to humans’ individual...

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March 1, 2015
Market Day, 2007, China marker on archival pigment print

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

This exhibition presents recent work by Washington, D.C.–based Victor Ekpuk. Born in 1964, Ekpuk trained at Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, in southwestern Nigeria, where he was first exposed to the possibilities of drawing. He developed his minimalist approach of reducing form to constituent lines while working as a cartoonist for Daily Times, a leading Nigerian newspaper, in the 1990s. A ceaseless experimentalist with...

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March 1, 2015
Small ukara with minute patterned design and Omu Aro symbol

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

This exhibition examines the ukara cloth of the Ekpe secret society, a multi-ethnic all-male association in southeastern Nigeria and western Cameroon, exploring both the longstanding cultural practice the cloth represents and the artistic process involved in its creation. The cloth is made of plain cotton but transformed into a ritual object when nsibidi symbols are inscribed onto it through indigo dyeing. Nsibidi...

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March 1, 2015
Brian Ulrich, Edinburgh, UK

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

The Hood Museum of Art recently received a major gift of contemporary photography from Nancy and Thomas F. O’Neil III, a Dartmouth alumnus from the Class of 1979. This outstanding group of thirty-nine photographs by seventeen photographers substantially enhances the museum’s growing collection of recent...

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January 15, 2015
Gar Waterman, Feral Seed

Hood Quarterly, winter 2015

A member of Dartmouth’s Class of 1978, Gar Waterman is best known for his meticulously hand-crafted sculptures and large-scale public art projects that take their inspiration from natural forms, such as plants, insects, shells, fish, nudibranchs, and other marine creatures. The youngest son of the pioneering oceanographic filmmaker Stan Waterman, Class of 1946, the artist grew up exploring the Maine coast and the barrier reefs of the South Pacific, which he visited between the ages...

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January 15, 2015
Nomusa Makhubu, Umasifanisane I (Comparison I)

Hood Quarterly, winter 2015

In Self-Portrait, Nomusa Makhubu (born 1984) presents a haunting vision of South Africa’s past by embedding her portrait on several colonial-type photographs. The Cape Town–based South African artist developed the visually compelling and evocative photographic series, comprised of thirteen prints, between 2007 and 2013. It...

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January 15, 2015
Gerry Williams, vase

Hood Quarterly, winter 2015

The Hood Museum of Art recently received a remarkable gift of 118 works of art originally collected by the late Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Dartmouth Class of 1947, and donated in their memory by their children, Susan E. Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl. Assembled over a period of 60 years, the works range from Old Master prints and drawings to works on paper, paintings,...

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