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January 1, 2007

Dartmouth Arctic Collections and the International Polar Year, 2007–8

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007
Ross A. Virginia, Director, Dickey Center Institute of Arctic Studies, Professor of Environmental Studies, Dartmouth College; Kenneth S. Yalowitz, Ambassador (Ret.) Director, Dickey Center for International Understanding, Adjunct Professor of Government, Dartmouth College; Gor Krupnik, Curator, Circumpolar Ethnology, Arctic Studies Center, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

...

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January 1, 2007

Climate and Weather within the Context of Inuit Life and Traditions

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007
Nicole S. Tuckenberger, Stefansson Postdoctoral Fellow, Curator of Thin Ice: Inuit Traditions within a Changing Environment

The Arctic is home to about four million people, both indigenous and more recently arrived from the south—living in towns or on the land as hunters, fishermen, herders or, most commonly, some combination of all three. The Arctic indigenous peoples have distinct but...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

This beautifully carved and painted wooden mask by the Tongass Tlingit artist Norman G. Jackson brings to light a contemporary reinterpretation of traditional Northwest Coast themes and mythical stories. In much Northwest Coast art, painted, carved, or woven imagery is used during special occasions to proclaim and validate the status of ancestral clan crests representing mythical beings.

Jackson depicts the important mythic being Sharkman, who...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

This cradleboard reveals the exquisite beadwork that epitomizes the Kiowa style of decoration in Native American art. The Kiowa developed what is possibly the most prominently known baby carrier in Plains art, the lattice cradle or cradleboard (popularly known as the “papoose”), which spread to the Comanche, Cheyenne, and Dakota tribes of the Central Plains.

The baby carrier is structured on a modified V-shaped framework upon which a deep,...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

The Hood Museum of Art’s recently acquired still life by Jan Davidsz de Heem is currently complemented by two other seventeenth-century Dutch paintings with similar subjects, by the artist’s teacher and most prominent pupil, respectively. The extraordinary works by Balthasar van der Ast and Abraham Mignon are on loan from the Currier Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Art and will remain on view through May. The installation is accompanied by...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

In the fall, the Hood made all Family Days and Teen Workshops free, adding them to the museum’s long list of programs that are also free, including lectures, gallery talks,receptions, symposia, tours, workshops, and ArtVentures. “We feel strongly that the museum and the full breadth of its programs should be fully accessible to our diverse audiences,” notes Lesley Wellman, Curator of Education.“This...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

Over the past six months, BARBARA THOMPSON, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections at the Hood Museum of Art, and JUDITH BYFIELD, Associate Professor of History at Dartmouth College, have facilitated the collection and shipment of over fifteen boxes of donated art books to the newly established Agbo Oshinowo Library at the National Gallery of Art in Lagos, Nigeria. This is the second art book drive that the Hood has contributed to in efforts to help fledgling...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

What do robots and art have in common? More than you might expect, and the significant connections between them inspired an exciting collaboration last summer among the Computer Science Department at Dartmouth, regional young people, and the Hood Museum of Art.

Each summer the Office of the Provost and the Department of Computer Science co-sponsor the Summer Robotics Program for Upper Valley Youth. Taught by visiting scholar Suzanne Thompson, Dartmouth students, and faculty...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director

One of the aspects of the Hood Museum of Art that most appeals to me is its embrace of a global perspective. It is a delight to know that Dartmouth College, in the small rural New England town of Hanover, New Hampshire, attracts international students and scholars and focuses academic effort on seeking to research, teach, and learn about the realities of our world. Dartmouth’s museum, the Hood, celebrates the arts of all peoples, including those who...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director

Very few exhibitions of contemporary Aboriginal art have been organized or hosted by civic museums in the United States. While admirable private collections have been established, most public museums have struggled to understand how contemporary Aboriginal art fits into the story of world art. For museums with an emphasis on social and cultural history, Indigenous Australian art can be considered too aesthetically based and market focused. Conversely,...

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