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News

January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

In the fall, the Hood made all Family Days and Teen Workshops free, adding them to the museum’s long list of programs that are also free, including lectures, gallery talks,receptions, symposia, tours, workshops, and ArtVentures. “We feel strongly that the museum and the full breadth of its programs should be fully accessible to our diverse audiences,” notes Lesley Wellman, Curator of Education.“This...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

Over the past six months, BARBARA THOMPSON, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections at the Hood Museum of Art, and JUDITH BYFIELD, Associate Professor of History at Dartmouth College, have facilitated the collection and shipment of over fifteen boxes of donated art books to the newly established Agbo Oshinowo Library at the National Gallery of Art in Lagos, Nigeria. This is the second art book drive that the Hood has contributed to in efforts to help fledgling...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

What do robots and art have in common? More than you might expect, and the significant connections between them inspired an exciting collaboration last summer among the Computer Science Department at Dartmouth, regional young people, and the Hood Museum of Art.

Each summer the Office of the Provost and the Department of Computer Science co-sponsor the Summer Robotics Program for Upper Valley Youth. Taught by visiting scholar Suzanne Thompson, Dartmouth students, and faculty...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director

One of the aspects of the Hood Museum of Art that most appeals to me is its embrace of a global perspective. It is a delight to know that Dartmouth College, in the small rural New England town of Hanover, New Hampshire, attracts international students and scholars and focuses academic effort on seeking to research, teach, and learn about the realities of our world. Dartmouth’s museum, the Hood, celebrates the arts of all peoples, including those who...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director

Very few exhibitions of contemporary Aboriginal art have been organized or hosted by civic museums in the United States. While admirable private collections have been established, most public museums have struggled to understand how contemporary Aboriginal art fits into the story of world art. For museums with an emphasis on social and cultural history, Indigenous Australian art can be considered too aesthetically based and market focused. Conversely,...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Lesley Wellman, Curator of Education

In many of the programs offered at the Hood, we engage visitors in the active interpretation of works of art. This engagement takes many different forms, but one that we have found works well for school children, teenagers, college students, and adults is descriptive and creative writing in response to works of art. The following poems inspired by works in the American collection demonstrate how effective this approach can be. Both poems...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director, and Katherine Hart, Associate Director

Of what value are photographs when reflecting upon historic events? Many are compelling images that give the look and feel of a time that is past—the way people dressed, their fleeting expressions, the particularity of a place at a certain day and hour. What truths are to be gleaned from them, if any? Why do some photographs become symbolic of an entire era?

The most famous are studied more for their impact...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

Caché is a powerful life-sized sculpture by Alison Saar, who was artist-in-residence in Dartmouth College’s Department of Studio Art in 2002. This work presents an autobiographical narrative layered with African and African American artistic and cultural references.

Caché is composed of a carved wooden figure of a reclining female nude swathed...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

Henry “Mike” Bannarn was an influential, academically trained artist intimately associated with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1930s. In addition to his art, which was widely exhibited and admired in his day, he was revered for his role as a mentor to other African American artists. Together with fellow artist Charles Alston, he ran a studio/workshop at 306 West 141st Street (dubbed “306”), which served not only as a...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006

BART THURBER, the Hood’s curator of European art, has been awarded a prestigious Craig Hugh Smyth Visiting Fellowship this fall at Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy. The fellowship, generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and supported by Dartmouth College’s Provost Office, will allow Thurber to conduct research on several paintings in the museum’s Italian Renaissance collection. He will also develop a book-length...

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