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News

June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003
Mark Mitchell, Luce Curatorial Assistant for American Art

As America celebrated its first centennial in 1876, the nation and its art stood at a crossroads, still recovering from the Civil War while at the dawn of the nation’s Gilded Age. Founded in 1871, the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum today remains a uniquely preserved historic center for the study of American art of the Centennial era. The Athenaeum’s collection, donated by its founder, Vermont Governor Horace Fairbanks, and his family, is an enduring tribute to the range and ambition of...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

Recent gifts by Edward B. Marks ’32 of a painting by Twins Seven Seven (born 1944, Nigeria) and a tapestry by Adebisi Fabunmi (born 1945, Ghana) mark a new expansion of the Hood’s collections into modern and contemporary African art.

Having lived in Nigeria during the 1960s, Mr. Marks became interested in a small group of artists working in the 1960s and 1970s in the Nigerian town of Oshogbo. Known as the Oshogbo School, this group of artists has created works in various...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

Blue Saxophone (1992), a vibrant and highly characteristic watercolor by Claes Oldenburg (born 1929), is the thirteenth work by the renowned Swedish-born Pop artist to enter the Hood’s permanent collection. Oldenburg is perhaps best known today for the monumental public sculpture in which everyday objects, like the musical instrument depicted here, are subjected to comic distortions of scale and gesture....

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

Pierre Daura (1896–1976) was born in Minorca, Spain, and spent most of his youth in Barcelona, where he studied art with Pablo Picasso’s father. He moved to Paris in 1914, painting and drawing in the European center of Bohemian artist life for the next fifteen years.

Daura emerged as a leader among a small coterie of abstract artists—including Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Piet Mondrian, and Kurt Schwitters— who later exhibited under the group name Cercle et Carré (Circle and Square). Boats by the Ebro...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

Why teach children about art? Surveys conducted in the 1990s by the Lila Wallace–Reader’s Digest Fund at museums across the country revealed that 66 percent of adults who visited museums had done so when they were children. At the Hood Museum of Art, surveys of adult visitors revealed an even higher average of 76 percent. Clearly, childhood experience plays a significant role in shaping lifelong interests and habits, and this is one of the reasons why the Hood offers a wide array of programs for visitors under the age of eighteen.

Each...

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March 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, spring 2003
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director

One of the primary aims of the new, expanded Hood Quarterly has been to share with our audiences more of what we are doing here at the Hood. By fully explaining the programs we provide and by posing more provocative questions of ourselves, the staff and I hope to engage you more deeply in the life of this institution. We also want to demystify the work that we perform on behalf of Dartmouth College....

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March 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, spring 2003
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director

Derrick Cartwright recalls the complexities of acquiring the Hood's most recent work of art. Juan Muñoz's Figure Hanging from One Foot is currently on display in the main stairway of the Hood Museum of Art; plans to install the work in the museum's Bedford Courtyard are also underway.

December 2001

While in Washington, D.C., I visited the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden to study the current exhibition of Juan Muñoz’s work. Muñoz had...

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March 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, spring 2003
Allen Hockley, Associate Professor of Art History, Dartmouth College, and curator of the exhibition

The ukiyo or floating world refers to the entertainment districts of Edo (now Tokyo) and the lifestyles and sensibilities they engendered. Taking glamorous courtesans and famous actors as their primary subjects, Japanese print artists of the eighteenth century developed a popular visual culture that explored the floating world’s intricate nuances in a medium that was highly sophisticated but relatively inexpensive.

The medium...

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March 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, spring 2003
Paula A. Bigboy '03, Curatorial Intern

They Still Draw Pictures is a stunning exhibition of children’s drawings completed during various twentieth-century wartimes from the Spanish Civil War to contemporary Kosovo. The exhibition has been arranged in a chronological discourse that wrenches the heart with innocent yet observant detail and raw emotion in sections entitled “Before: Memories of Loss,” “War,” “Displacement,” “Camps,” and “Peace.”

These are drawings done...

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March 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, spring 2003

In 1973, Sebastião Salgado (born 1944) abandoned a promising career as an economist to pursue photography. Like his colleague James Nachtwey, Salgado has dedicated his career to documenting the lives of suffering and survival led by the world’s refugee and migrant populations.

This recent acquisition, entitled Brasil (Hand, Serra Pelada), 1986, is part of Salgado’s six-year...

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