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News

September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003
T. Barton Thurber, Curator of European Art

By the time William Legge, Second Earl of Dartmouth (1731–1801), and Robert Clements, later First Earl of Leitrim (1732–1804), traveled to Rome in the early 1750s, the so-called Grand Tour to Italy was already considered an essential ingredient in the proper education of many upperclass Europeans, especially young English, Irish, and Scottish noblemen. Guided by early published accounts and traveling according to standard itineraries,...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

School at Fort Marion is one of three recent acquisitions of Plains ledger drawings from the Mark Lansburgh collection. In this work, the Cheyenne warrior-artist Chief Killer (1849–1922) depicts a classroom scene of Native American captives, including Chief Killer and other well-known ledger artists, being schooled by volunteer teachers during their internment at Fort Marion from 1875 to 1878. The drawing, the earliest Native American work on paper...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Louis-Léopold Boilly (1761–1845) first established his reputation as an accomplished portraitist and genre painter at the Paris Salon exhibitions during the French Revolution (1789–99). The painting that brought him his greatest success was the Gathering of Artists in Isabey’s Studio exhibited in the 1798 Salon (and now in the Musée du Louvre).

It was accompanied by a drawing that Boilly evidently intended as another homage to his friend Jean-Baptiste Isabey (1767–1855), a renowned master draftsman. The highly finished portrayal...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Drawing for “Evening” is the first drawing by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926) to enter the museum’s collection. This remarkably innovative study for a print dates from around 1879–80, which was an especially formative and experimental period in Cassatt’s career. It was in 1879 that Cassatt, arguably the most celebrated American woman artist of the nineteenth century, first exhibited with the French Impressionists and...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

In mid-nineteenth-century America, drawing was an important skill enjoyed by many amateur women and schoolgirls, particularly those privileged to study at private female academies. Along with music, needlework, and fine penmanship, the ability to draw conveyed one’s proper education and appreciation for beauty—qualities highly valued in a prospective wife, mother, or future teacher.

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to have received as a gift from Professor of Theater Margaret E. Spicer a collection of delightful mid-nineteenth-century...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Each year, the New England Museum Association (NEMA) sponsors a Publication Awards Program, recognizing excellence in design, production, and effective communication in museum publishing.This year, two Hood publications were awarded high honors, both directed by Juliette Bianco, Exhibitions Manager, and Nils Nadeau, Editor/Publications Coordinator. The Hood Quarterly, designed by Joanna Bodenweber, won first place in the Newsletter...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director

Charles W. Moore, the principal architect of the Hood Museum of Art, wrote often and passionately about a prominent role for the arts in contemporary life. In a youthful essay entitled “New Hope for Local Art” (1952), he critiqued the concept of the art museum as an “artistic Fort Knox”—an intimidating edifice focused narrowly upon its custodial role as protector of valuable objects. In the place of that notion, Moore advocated for a contrasting ideal, one where the museum stood out as “a living thing, with a...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

Recently, Amanda Potter ’02, Student Programming Assistant at the Hood, sat down with this year’s Hood senior interns to discuss A Space for Dialogue: Fresh Perspectives on the Permanent Collection from Dartmouth’s Students. Now in its second year, this innovative project allows students to create their own micro-exhibitions for the...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

During the Spring 2003 term, MARGARET ARCHULETA (Pueblo/Hispanic) came to the Hood Museum of Art as Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Visiting Scholar to make recommendations for the development and curricular use of modern and contemporary Native American art. Ms. Archuleta, formerly Curator of Fine Art at the Heard Museum, is an independent curator who came to Dartmouth College in 2002–2003 as the Gordon Russell Visiting Professor in the Native American Studies Program. Her gallery talk, “Hampton’s Indian Program: An Experiment in...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003
Juliette Bianco, Exhibitions Manager

What is regional about regional art? The Hood Museum of Art’s exhibition Regional Selections 30 celebrates three decades of thought about that very question through the Dartmouth community’s ongoing dedication to exhibiting the work of Vermont and New Hampshire artists. To mark this anniversary and to recognize not only our outstanding regional artists but also the many regional institutions devoted to supporting them, the Hood has...

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