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News

March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

This past November, the museum lost a valued and respected employee, Phil Langan. In his role as a visitor services and security staff member over the last four and a half years, Phil was a welcoming and gracious advocate for the museum. Prior to working at the Hood, Phil had a long and illustrious career in the field of sports information at such institutions as Harvard University, Ithaca College, Princeton University, Cornell University...

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September 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2009-10
Katherine Hart, Associate Director and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

Art is closely linked to the twin muses of creativity and imagination. Whether expressed through paint on canvas, words on a page, emulsion on paper, or pixels on a screen, art originates as an expression of human intellect, emotion, and aspiration. This fall, the Hood will showcase the work of...

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January 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, winter 2009
Emily Shubert Burke, Assistant Curator, Special Projects

Focus on Photography marks the first survey of post-1950 works from the Hood Museum of Art’s photography collection, in anticipation of and collaboration with this coming fall’s landmark exhibition Modern and Contemporary Art at Dartmouth: Highlights from the Hood Museum of Art....

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September 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2008
Emily Shubert, Assistant Curator, Special Projects

Hiroh Kikai is a contemporary Japanese photographer renowned for his black-andwhite portraits of people in Asakusa, Tokyo, a neighborhood with a colorful past now known for both traditional comedy theater and some of the most innovative burlesque in the world. Over the past three decades, Kikai has created an extensive and unforgettable series of street portraits from the diverse mass of people who pass...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

For some time now, museum exhibitions of contemporary art have focused on issues of identity and race. Few curators, however, have sought to investigate these themes by juxtaposing historical and contemporary perspectives. Black Womanhood: Images, Icons, and Ideologies of the African Body looks at the historical roots of a charged icon, the...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008
Kristin Monahan Garcia, Curatorial Assistant for Academic and Student Programming

As aspiring art student Ed Ruscha drove the now mythic Route 66 from Oklahoma City to Los Angeles in 1956, the world around him was changing rapidly. A postwar economic boom had brought abundance for many and supported a burgeoning consumer society, while new technology delivered information (and images) with a previously unimagined speed and scope. These developments, especially in the economy,...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008

The Hood Museum of Art recently acquired by purchase and gift from Marion MacKaye Ober a group of photographs that descended in the family of dramatist and poet Percy MacKaye (1875–1956). MacKaye was an active member of the Cornish, New Hampshire, art colony and is best known locally and nationally for having played an important role in reviving interest in poetic drama in the early twentieth century. A large collection of his papers is in Dartmouth’s Rauner Special Collections...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008

In 1994, the Hood Museum of Art presented an exhibition of the photographs of Barbara Morgan (1900–1992) in conjunction with the residency of the Martha Graham Dance Company at Dartmouth. Morgan photographed Graham and her company from the mid-1930s until the mid-1940s and in the process became one of the most esteemed dance photographers of the twentieth century.

The Hood recently received a generous...

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January 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, winter 2008

Relying on photography and digital reproduction methods, Seminole/Muscogee/ Diné artist Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie (born 1954) creates powerful visual statements that reflect her personal perspective as well as Native American philosophy. Her subjects derive from vintage and contemporary imagery; at times they look out of the artwork to ponder, question, and challenge what they see; at times they are given agency and voice through Tsinhnahjinnie’s social and political commentary and...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Victor Masayesva Jr., who grew up on a Hopi Reservation in Hotevilla, Arizona, incorporates Hopi symbolism into his photography to depict the ruptured balance between humans and nature. Using antlers, flower petals, feathers, snake skins, cornstalks, and bones as visual metaphors for the cycle of life and death, Masayesva juxtaposes the destruction of humans, animals, land, and spirit against the reality of regeneration, life, and beauty in the southwestern landscape.

The...

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