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September 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2009-10

In order to complement the Hood’s extensive collection of American silver, the museum is making a concerted effort to build comparable collections of American glass and ceramics. The acquisition of this pair of pitchers represents a significant advance toward this goal. The Philadelphia factories associated with...

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March 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2009
Karen Miller, Exhibitions and Programs Coordinator

The Hood Museum of Art has, in recent years, been engaged in an effort to expand its reach across campus and to the broader community. Toward this end, a number of artworks have been placed on the Dartmouth campus, and in 2007 a major project by Chinese artist Wenda Gu was installed at Baker Library. In keeping with the museum’s interest in public art...

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January 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, winter 2009
Emily Shubert Burke, Assistant Curator, Special Projects

Focus on Photography marks the first survey of post-1950 works from the Hood Museum of Art’s photography collection, in anticipation of and collaboration with this coming fall’s landmark exhibition Modern and Contemporary Art at Dartmouth: Highlights from the Hood Museum of Art....

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September 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2008
Joshua Chuang (Class of 1998), Assistant Curator of Photographs, Yale University Art Gallery

The following is an excerpt from Joshua Chuang’s introductory essay to the forthcoming exhibition catalogue Immanence and Revelation: The Art of Ben Frank Moss, titled “Call and Response: The Life and Work of Ben Frank Moss.”

To behold...

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September 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2008
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

Not surprisingly, American art collections in American museums most often have a regional flavor, reflecting an institution’s history, location, and patronage. The Hood, for instance, has particular strengths in White Mountain landscapes and portraits of Dartmouth luminaries and, in general, works by artists based in the Northeast. Although there is much to be gained from building collections with local resonance,...

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September 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2008
Emily Shubert, Assistant Curator, Special Projects

Hiroh Kikai is a contemporary Japanese photographer renowned for his black-andwhite portraits of people in Asakusa, Tokyo, a neighborhood with a colorful past now known for both traditional comedy theater and some of the most innovative burlesque in the world. Over the past three decades, Kikai has created an extensive and unforgettable series of street portraits from the diverse mass of people who pass...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008

The sculptor Larry Fane’s interest in engineering and the three-dimensional language of the functional object is apparent in the Hood’s new acquisition Mill Piece, a remarkable work constructed of various kinds of wood. Fane exploits the texture, color, and grain of the wood, which he has fashioned into forms that evoke New England’s industrial past. Born in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1933, Fane studied at Harvard and the Boston Museum School...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

For some time now, museum exhibitions of contemporary art have focused on issues of identity and race. Few curators, however, have sought to investigate these themes by juxtaposing historical and contemporary perspectives. Black Womanhood: Images, Icons, and Ideologies of the African Body looks at the historical roots of a charged icon, the...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008
Kristin Monahan Garcia, Curatorial Assistant for Academic and Student Programming

As aspiring art student Ed Ruscha drove the now mythic Route 66 from Oklahoma City to Los Angeles in 1956, the world around him was changing rapidly. A postwar economic boom had brought abundance for many and supported a burgeoning consumer society, while new technology delivered information (and images) with a previously unimagined speed and scope. These developments, especially in the economy,...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008

British painter Joseph Blackburn (active 1752–78) provided a pivotally important example of the British rococo to colonial America, where he worked from 1754 to 1762. He was among just a handful of portrait painters active in New England before the ascent of native-born John Singleton Copley (1738–1815), who matured as an artist in the late 1750s under Blackburn’s influence. Copley’s emergence as a serious competitor likely persuaded Blackburn to move to Portsmouth, New Hampshire,...

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