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News

March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012

Man Ray (1890–1976), a pioneering American modernist associated with dada and surrealism, captured this image as part of a photographic series he made beginning in 1934 of “mathematical objects”—old plaster models of algebraic formulae that he encountered on display in dusty cases in Paris’s Institut Henri Poincaré, named for the highly influential mathematician who popularized principles of relativity and non-Euclidian geometry (the geometry of curved planes). Man Ray appropriated these...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012

The Hood Museum of Art is home to the George Maciunas Memorial Collection, established upon Maciunas’s death in 1978 to honor the Lithuanian-born founder of the international movement Fluxus. This radical and influential cultural phenomenon emerged in the early 1960s as part of a global cultural impulse to blur the boundaries between art and life. The George Maciunas Memorial Collection, which grew to just over five hundred...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012
Michael Taylor, Director

This spring, the Hood Museum of Art will join in a worldwide celebration of the centenary of Jackson Pollock’s birth in 1912. In partnership with the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, the museum presents Men of Fire: José Clemente Orozco and Jackson Pollock, an exhibition that exploresthe deep impact that Orozco’s murals had on this emerging artist. The exhibition also marks the eightieth anniversary of Dartmouth’s famous mural...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012
Juliette Bianco, Assistant Director and co-curator of the exhibition

Nature Transformed takes as its starting point a remarkable series of photographs by internationally celebrated artist Edward Burtynsky. His now signature pursuit of conceptual subjects—from oil extraction in the United States and in Azerbaijan to shipbreaking in Bangladesh, electronics factories and immense wire recycling yards in China, and nickel and uranium mine tailings in Canada—...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012
Michael Taylor, Director

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to announce the acquisition of Marcel Duchamp’s Boîte-en-valise (Box in a Valise), one of the most important and influential works of art of the twentieth century. Arguably modern art’s greatest iconoclast, Marcel Duchamp (American, born France, 1887–1968) devoted his entire career to debunking pre-existing ideas about art, which he believed should appeal to the intellect rather than the senses. This can be seen in...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12
Karen S. Miller, Assistant Curator for Special Projects

Native American Art at Dartmouth surveys for the first time the breadth and depth of the museum’s collection of indigenous art of North America, from the historical to the contemporary.

The Native American collections are crucial to the museum’s mission of teaching with objects, and to presenting the essential continuity within Native...

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September 1, 2011
Fritz Scholder, Dartmouth Portrait #17, 1973, oil on canvas, acrylic background. Purchased through the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Jaffe Hall Fund; P.974.11

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12
Emily Shubert Burke

Native American painter Fritz Scholder was born in Breckenridge, Minnesota, in 1937.Trained by theYanktonai Sioux artist Oscar Howe from 1950 to 1954, Scholder later studied painting and art history at California State University, Sacramento, under the tutelage ofWayne Thiebaud, where he was influenced by the broad ideology of Pop Art. Beginning as an abstract colorist, Scholder shifted his focus during the 1960s to an expressionistic exploration of Native...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12
Michael Taylor, Director

In spring 2009, the Hood Museum of Art commissioned Mateo Romero, Class of 1989, to paint a series of ten portraits of current Native American Dartmouth students as they danced at the college’s annual Pow-Wow. Romero, born in 1966, is Tewa, Cochiti Pueblo, and lives on the Pojoaque Reservation north of Santa...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

Through the generosity of Everett Parker, Class of 1952, and his two sons, David and William—also Dartmouth graduates—the Hood Museum of Art was able to add an important painting to its extensive collection of works by Paul Sample, Dartmouth Class of 1920 and artist-in-residence at the college from 1938 until 1962. Sample gained particular acclaim for his scenes of rural life in New Hampshire and Vermont, especially in winter. Such images have long held special significance and...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

This past year, along with many generous individual donations of works of art, the Hood Museum of Art received a number of significant group gifts. These works from patrons and donors will add significantly to both our contemporary and our photography collections. In addition to the gifts listed here, we also received a gift of five works from the Sam...

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