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News

September 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2013
Sarah Powers, Curator for Special Projects

I n 1907, Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque met through a mutual friend, the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. The two artists would become creative and intellectual partners in the creation of a radical art movement known as cubism. From their meeting until the advent of World War I in 1914, Picasso and Braque worked in tandem to develop a new pictorial language that challenged and defied the traditional Renaissance notion that...

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September 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2013
Mark Williams, Associate Professor, Film and Media Studies

Phil Solomon is one of the most acclaimed and enduring figures in experimental film and media. An acolyte, friend, and colleague of Stan Brakhage, he has worked in many media and pioneered numerous visionary inter-medial processes of moving-image production. His interest in visual culture was sparked during his childhood, when his father gave him a microscope. His artistic work over the...

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August 1, 2013
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Hood Museum of Art Revisits Influential Picasso Print Series alongside the Works That Inspired It

Recognized as one of the most innovative and influential artists of the twentieth century, Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) was at his most ferociously inventive between 1930 and 1937, when he created a dazzling series of etchings that are known today as the Vollard Suite. The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, one of the few museums in the world to own the complete series, is delighted to present the entire Vollard Suite in...

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June 1, 2013
Francesca Woodman, My House, Providence, Rhode Island, 1976, estate gelatin silver print, edition 9 of 40, printed 2008. Purchased through a gift from Marina and Andrew E. Lewin, Class of 1981; 2013.12.1 © George and Betty Woodman

Hood Quarterly, summer 2013

The museum recently acquired its first works by photographer Francesca Woodman (1958–1981). Two of the photographs, Space2 and My House, date from when she was an undergraduate student at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) between 1975 and 1978. They were purchased through the generous support of Marina and Andrew E. Lewin, Class of...

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June 1, 2013
Ansel Adams, Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958, negative date: 1958; print date: between 1963 and 1973, gelatin silver print. Purchased in memory of Edward A. Hansen, Member of the Board of the Hopkins Center and Hood Museum of Art, with gifts from his wi

Hood Quarterly, summer 2013

Considered the preeminent 20th-century landscape photographer, Ansel Adams demonstrates his mastery in conveying the effects of light in a landscape in this iconic image of an aspen wood. The photograph was acquired in memory of Edward Hansen, a former member of the Board of the Hopkins Center and Hood Museum of Art, with funds donated in his honor by his friends and family, his wife, Julia, and his children, Victoria, Class of 1988, and Christopher, Class of 1985. When Hansen...

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January 1, 2013
Marguerite Thompson Zorach, Mountain Stream, about 1917, oil on canvas. Purchased through the Katharine T. and Merrill G. Beede 1929 Fund and the Florence and Lansing Porter Moore 1937 Fund; 2012.42.

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013

Marguerite Thompson Zorach (American, 1887–1968) began her career at the forefront of American modernism, having circulated in avant-garde circles from 1908 to 1911 in Paris and, following her return to the United States in 1912, in New York. She incorporated into her personal style aspects of cubism, fauvism, and German expressionism, with its emphasis on the spiritual in nature. Reflecting her deep connection to the outdoors, she often painted abstracted, Arcadian landscapes that...

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January 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013
Tricia Y. Paik ’91, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Saint Louis Art Museum

This fall, Dartmouth College unveiled a monumental wall sculpture by leading American artist Ellsworth Kelly. Commissioned by Leon Black ’73 and his wife, Debra Black, Dartmouth Panels, a multicolored, site-specific work, was conceived in conjunction with the new Black Family Visual Arts Center, also dedicated this fall and made possible by a $48...

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January 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013

As part of the Year of the Arts initiative at Dartmouth during the 2012–13 academic year, Crouching Spider by French-born American artist Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010) has been installed on campus in the Maffei Arts Plaza, in front of the new Black Family Visual Arts Center.

For more than seven decades, Bourgeois pursued conflicting psychological and emotional impulses to create intensely autobiographical sculptures that also addressed universal themes, such as...

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September 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2012
Juliette Bianco, Assistant Director

Denver-based multimedia artist Stacey Steers conceived her Night Hunter House around her sixteen-minute handmade film, shot in 35mm color, titled Night Hunter (2011). The film, incorporated into the house itself, is composed of more than four thousand collages, an intensely laborious process that Steers completed over a four-year period. The music and sound from...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012
Michael Taylor, Director

This spring, the Hood Museum of Art will join in a worldwide celebration of the centenary of Jackson Pollock’s birth in 1912. In partnership with the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, the museum presents Men of Fire: José Clemente Orozco and Jackson Pollock, an exhibition that exploresthe deep impact that Orozco’s murals had on this emerging artist. The exhibition also marks the eightieth anniversary of Dartmouth’s famous mural...

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