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January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Terry Adkins was the Artist-in-Residence at Dartmouth College during the summer of 2003. A memorable exhibition of his work took place in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries in Hopkins Center at that time, and Still (2000) was a centerpiece of that project.

Adkins is a well-respected sculptor whose installations and assemblages are characterized by a profound sensitivity to found objects and a deep, highly personal appreciation for African American history. This alluring floor piece combines...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

School at Fort Marion is one of three recent acquisitions of Plains ledger drawings from the Mark Lansburgh collection. In this work, the Cheyenne warrior-artist Chief Killer (1849–1922) depicts a classroom scene of Native American captives, including Chief Killer and other well-known ledger artists, being schooled by volunteer teachers during their internment at Fort Marion from 1875 to 1878. The drawing, the earliest Native American work on paper...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Drawing for “Evening” is the first drawing by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926) to enter the museum’s collection. This remarkably innovative study for a print dates from around 1879–80, which was an especially formative and experimental period in Cassatt’s career. It was in 1879 that Cassatt, arguably the most celebrated American woman artist of the nineteenth century, first exhibited with the French Impressionists and...

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September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

In mid-nineteenth-century America, drawing was an important skill enjoyed by many amateur women and schoolgirls, particularly those privileged to study at private female academies. Along with music, needlework, and fine penmanship, the ability to draw conveyed one’s proper education and appreciation for beauty—qualities highly valued in a prospective wife, mother, or future teacher.

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to have received as a gift from Professor of Theater Margaret E. Spicer a collection of delightful mid-nineteenth-century...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003
Mark Mitchell, Luce Curatorial Assistant for American Art

As America celebrated its first centennial in 1876, the nation and its art stood at a crossroads, still recovering from the Civil War while at the dawn of the nation’s Gilded Age. Founded in 1871, the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum today remains a uniquely preserved historic center for the study of American art of the Centennial era. The Athenaeum’s collection, donated by its founder, Vermont Governor Horace Fairbanks, and his family, is an enduring tribute to the range and ambition of...

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June 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, summer 2003

Blue Saxophone (1992), a vibrant and highly characteristic watercolor by Claes Oldenburg (born 1929), is the thirteenth work by the renowned Swedish-born Pop artist to enter the Hood’s permanent collection. Oldenburg is perhaps best known today for the monumental public sculpture in which everyday objects, like the musical instrument depicted here, are subjected to comic distortions of scale and gesture....

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