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News

September 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2013

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to announce the appointment of Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi as Curator of African Art. A specialist in modern and contemporary African and African Diaspora arts, Nzewi will be responsible for the documentation, preservation, research, and development of the museum’s African art collection— which encompasses some 1,900 historic and contemporary objects from all regions of the continent in a variety of media—and will engage Dartmouth faculty and students...

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September 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2013
Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi, Curator of African Art

In 1989, the Dak’Art Biennial was officially created by the government of Senegal as the first art biennial in sub-Saharan Africa. Its mandate was to promote the latest examples of contemporary African art and facilitate the discourse of artistic contemporaneity from an African perspective. I focus on the Dak’Art Biennial as an important context to explore the shift in contemporary African art since the 1990s. The bases of the...

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March 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2011

Egyptian Art at the Museum

Christine Lilyquist, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s former head of the Department of Egyptian Art and Lila Acheson Wallace Research Curator in Egyptology, has served as advisor and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Visiting Scholar at the Hood over the past few years as she has researched and catalogued the museum’s collection of ancient Egyptian objects. During her career at the Met, Dr. Lilyquist directed the reinstallation of the...

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September 1, 2009

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2009-10
Alexander Bortolot, Curator of the Exhibition

Art That Lives? draws upon masterworks of African art from the permanent collection to examine the rich variety of human responses to figural images. Complemented by two European works of art, they speak to the ways people in Africa and beyond have regarded artworks as active forces in their own lives and the wider world. Not only have they perceived certain...

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March 1, 2008

Hood Quarterly, spring 2008
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

For some time now, museum exhibitions of contemporary art have focused on issues of identity and race. Few curators, however, have sought to investigate these themes by juxtaposing historical and contemporary perspectives. Black Womanhood: Images, Icons, and Ideologies of the African Body looks at the historical roots of a charged icon, the...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

This fall term, Dartmouth College Humanities Institute participants, including visiting residential fellows and several Dartmouth faculty members, are meeting weekly on campus to investigate the impact of visual humor on history, psychology, culture, and everyday life from multiple perspectives. No Laughing Matter is led by David Bindman (Morton Distinguished Fellow) and Angela Rosenthal (Dartmouth Institute Director), under the auspices of the Leslie Center for the...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007

Magdalene Odundo is an internationally acclaimed ceramic artist whose handbuilt vessels have become the fulcrum of a world of pottery traditions. Born in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1950, Odundo is presently professor of ceramics at the Surrey Institute of Art and Design University College in Farnham.

Odundo’s thin-walled vessels embody a farflung ceramic history that...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

Art grows out of each particular situation, and I believe that artists are better off working with whatever their environment throws up. —El Anatsui, 2003

El Anatsui uses found objects to celebrate Africa’s rich artistic and cultural heritage while commenting on broader concerns in Africa today, particularly the adverse effects of globalization, cosumerism, and waste. The exhibition El Anatsui: GAWU features the Hood’s...

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January 1, 2004

An Interview with Hugh Davies, The David C. Copley Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004
Derrick R. Cartwright, Director, Hood Museum of Art, and Hugh Davies, The David C. Copley Director, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Interview conducted September 17, 2003

Lateral Thinking: Art of the 1990s is a deep survey of vanguard representational practices from the preceding decade, all drawn from the permanent collection of the Museum of Contemporary...

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January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Since the 1960s, Malick Sidibé (born 1935) has photographed the making of modern Mali in the streets, nightclubs, and photo studios of Bamako. In his early work, Sidibé captured snapshot images of young Malians rejoicing in their newly created, Western-influenced cultural identities during the post-independence era. In more recent years, however, Sidibé has turned to the staged setting of a photo studio, shifting his role from a documentarian to an...

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