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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

Art grows out of each particular situation, and I believe that artists are better off working with whatever their environment throws up. —El Anatsui, 2003

El Anatsui uses found objects to celebrate Africa’s rich artistic and cultural heritage while commenting on broader concerns in Africa today, particularly the adverse effects of globalization, cosumerism, and waste. The exhibition El Anatsui: GAWU features the Hood’s...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

This beautifully carved and painted wooden mask by the Tongass Tlingit artist Norman G. Jackson brings to light a contemporary reinterpretation of traditional Northwest Coast themes and mythical stories. In much Northwest Coast art, painted, carved, or woven imagery is used during special occasions to proclaim and validate the status of ancestral clan crests representing mythical beings.

Jackson depicts the important mythic being Sharkman, who...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director

Very few exhibitions of contemporary Aboriginal art have been organized or hosted by civic museums in the United States. While admirable private collections have been established, most public museums have struggled to understand how contemporary Aboriginal art fits into the story of world art. For museums with an emphasis on social and cultural history, Indigenous Australian art can be considered too aesthetically based and market focused. Conversely,...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Brian Kennedy, Director, and Katherine Hart, Associate Director

Of what value are photographs when reflecting upon historic events? Many are compelling images that give the look and feel of a time that is past—the way people dressed, their fleeting expressions, the particularity of a place at a certain day and hour. What truths are to be gleaned from them, if any? Why do some photographs become symbolic of an entire era?

The most famous are studied more for their impact...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

Caché is a powerful life-sized sculpture by Alison Saar, who was artist-in-residence in Dartmouth College’s Department of Studio Art in 2002. This work presents an autobiographical narrative layered with African and African American artistic and cultural references.

Caché is composed of a carved wooden figure of a reclining female nude swathed...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

Henry “Mike” Bannarn was an influential, academically trained artist intimately associated with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1930s. In addition to his art, which was widely exhibited and admired in his day, he was revered for his role as a mentor to other African American artists. Together with fellow artist Charles Alston, he ran a studio/workshop at 306 West 141st Street (dubbed “306”), which served not only as a...

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June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004
Kevin Perry ’04, Megan Fontanella ’04, and Jennifer Schreck ’04, Hood Museum of Art interns

This winter, Kevin Perry ’04, public relations intern, interviewed Megan Fontanella ’04, Class of 1954 intern, and Jennifer Schreck ’04, part-time special projects intern, about the exhibition they curated during their senior year. The show features the work of over two dozen photographers, all of them women, from the permanent collection of the Hood.

KEVIN: Why...

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June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004
Roberto Tejada, Assistant Professor, Art History, Theory, and Criticism, Visual Arts Department, University of California, San Diego, and co-curator of the exhibition

Luis Gispert is an image-maker in the comprehensive sense of the word. Loud Image presents a broad range of his works—photographic, time-based, and sculptural—with the aim of prompting a conversation between them in order to...

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June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004
Katherine Hart, Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

The Hood Museum of Art’s Lathrop Gallery is dedicated to showing modern and contemporary works from the collection in honor of Churchill P. Lathrop and his wife, Dorothy. Churchill Lathrop was an early member of the college’s art department and a longstanding advocate of modern and contemporary art during his years at Dartmouth. With his colleague Artemas Packard, Churchill Lathrop created the college’s...

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June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004

Beginning in the 1930s, Isabel Bishop captured in her art the ordinary, fleeting gestures of city inhabitants as observed on the streets and public conveyances of Manhattan. Like her fellow “Fourteenth Street School” artists, including Reginald Marsh, she used a lively, reportorial style to convey the bustling street life around this commercial downtown neighborhood. Bishop brought an especially intimate regard to her numerous images of female office workers chatting on street corners, striding confidently along the sidewalks, or stopping to pull...

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