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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007

Moody Currier (1806–1898) created an extraordinary legacy: his will provided for the establishment of an art museum in Manchester, New Hampshire. After his own death and that of his third wife, Hannah, in 1915, a board of trustees was appointed to carry out the Curriers’ wishes. His bequest for the museum included a significant endowment for purchasing art, and as a result the Currier Museum of Art has been able to buy works of art that in turn have attracted generous donations...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L.Cohen Curator of American Art

This summer through fall, the Hood presents the largest selection ever from its rich holdings of American art dating before 1950. These collections, which now number more than eight thousand objects, began with a gift in 1773 of a Boston-made silver bowl given by Royal Governor John Wentworth to Dartmouth’s founder, Eleazar...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007

Nicholas Galanin, an emerging Tlingit artist, constructs enigmatic sculptures of masklike faces from blank sheets and pages from nineteenth-century anthropological books as part of a series of paper sculptures addressing the politics of cultural representation and contemporary indigenous identity. The materiality of the sculptures is significant to him.

Commenting on the outsider’s...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007

The Hood and the Dartmouth College Library have introduced new interpretive tools to enhance visitors’ experiences with José Clemente Orozco’s The Epic of American Civilization (1932–34), arguably the most important mural cycle in the United States.

Located in the Reserve Corridor of the College’s Baker Library and maintained by the Hood, the murals provide students with the extraordinary...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007
Juliette Bianco, Assistant Director

In addition to presenting the green house, the Hood Museum of Art premieres another new Wenda Gu work this summer, the first in a series of large books. Wenda Gu: Retranslation and Rewriting Tang Dynasty Poetry will elucidate the themes explored in the hair monument by demonstrating, in book form, what happens when poetry is translated from one language to another and back again.

The book is based on his Forest...

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March 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Brian Kennedy, Director

Although Jackson Pollock, like many great artists, was always reluctant to reveal any artistic influences on his work, it has long been known that he was powerfully affected by the Mexican muralists Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and José Clemente Orozco. Scholars had suggested over the years that Pollock must have seen the extraordinary mural cycle The Epic of American Civilization, which was painted...

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March 1, 2007
Subhankar Banerjee, Caribou Migration I, 2002, UltraChrome print. Purchased through the Charles F. Venrick 1936 Fund; 2006.61

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Katherine Hart, Associate Director and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

Five years ago, Subhankar Banerjee spent almost two years in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, photographing this remote region in northeastern Alaska in all four seasons. His work there coincided with the push by oil companies and the current U.S. administration to open up the oil and gas reserves on the coastal plain to drilling. During his travels over nearly four thousand miles of the 19.5-million-acre...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

Nunavut—“our land” in Inuktitut, the Inuit language—is the region of Canada that encompasses the area around Hudson Bay, west of Greenland. It was created in 1999 as part of a land claim settlement with the Canadian government by the region’s native people, who call themselves Inuit, “the people.” This remarkable transfer of land, the first in Canada in over fifty years, separated Nunavut from the Northwest Territories. Our Land includes sculptures, prints, textiles,...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Kristin Monahan Garcia, Curatorial Assistant for Academic and Student Programming

Pilobolus, the dance group that emerged from a Dartmouth classroom in 1971, has toured worldwide in the thirty-five years since its founding, created an institute of educational programming, launched touring companies, and profoundly influenced the world of contemporary dance. Now they have come home again.

The company’s spring visit to the College celebrates the donation of the Pilobolus archives to the Dartmouth College...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

Gamin is the best-known work by Augusta Savage, the most admired and influential woman artist associated with the Harlem Renaissance. The life-size bronze version of this work (Schomburg Center, New York Public Library) won Savage the opportunity to study in Paris from 1929 to 1931.

Although Gamin has invoked for viewers the ubiquitous street boys of Harlem, Savage actually modeled the sculpture after her nephew and fellow Harlem resident Ellis Ford, who had earned...

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