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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Continuing through the fall, the Hood presents the largest selection ever—over 150 paintings, sculptures, silver pieces, and other decorative arts—from its rich holdings of American art dating before 1950. These collections, which now number more than eight thousand objects, began with a gift in 1773 of a Boston-made silver bowl given by Royal Governor John Wentworth to Dartmouth’s founder, Eleazar Wheelock, in honor of the College’s first commencement. Thanks to the generosity of...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

This fall term, Dartmouth College Humanities Institute participants, including visiting residential fellows and several Dartmouth faculty members, are meeting weekly on campus to investigate the impact of visual humor on history, psychology, culture, and everyday life from multiple perspectives. No Laughing Matter is led by David Bindman (Morton Distinguished Fellow) and Angela Rosenthal (Dartmouth Institute Director), under the auspices of the Leslie Center for the...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007
Kristin Monahan Garcia, Curatorial Assistant for Academic and Student Programming

This past April, the Hood Museum of Art joined the campus-wide celebration of the Montgomery Endowment’s residency of dance pioneers Pilobolus with the exhibition Pilobolus Comes Home: Three Decades of Dance Photographs. The photographs displayed in the exhibition, works of art in their own right, reinforced the connection between...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007
Brian Kennedy, Director

The art of Wenda Gu is founded in the history, culture, and traditions of his native China. He has been preoccupied artistically with finding contemporary and global applications for the knowledge and skills he has learned about Chinese traditions of printmaking and bookbinding, the carving of stone steles and the building of great walls, the writing of Tang poetry, and the design of political posters. He has explored these traditions in radical ways...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

The Hood is delighted to have received from Hanover resident Philip H. Greene a gift of thirteen paintings that represent the vitality of the “California-style” watercolorists. This informal but closely knit group of artists was most active from the late 1920s through the 1950s, primarily in...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Victor Masayesva Jr., who grew up on a Hopi Reservation in Hotevilla, Arizona, incorporates Hopi symbolism into his photography to depict the ruptured balance between humans and nature. Using antlers, flower petals, feathers, snake skins, cornstalks, and bones as visual metaphors for the cycle of life and death, Masayesva juxtaposes the destruction of humans, animals, land, and spirit against the reality of regeneration, life, and beauty in the southwestern landscape.

The...

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September 1, 2007
Preston Singletary, Tlingit Crest Hat

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

Traditionally, Northwest coast Native peoples made crest hats of cedar bark decorated with formline designs that were painted onto the wood with black, red, or green dyes. These abstract designs still assert ancestral lineages linking family members to specific animal or nature spirits.

Preston Singletary uses traditional Tlingit art forms and iconography as the foundation for his glasswork, as exemplified by this luminous blue sculpture in the...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2007

From four generations of photographers, Lotte Jacobi took over her father’s Berlin photographic studio in 1927. She became one of the best-known photographers in Germany, particularly noted for her portraits of celebrities and artists. In 1935 she was forced to flee Nazi Germany and opened a studio and gallery in New York City, where she continued to pursue portraiture while freelancing as a photographer for Life magazine.

Here, in a...

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September 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007
Juliette Bianco, Assistant Director

Art is a conversation between its maker and the beholder, whether across millennia or in the here and now. Artists working today, of course, must negotiate along with the rest of us, in “real time,” life in the twenty-first century. Their work is not a window into the past but a mirror of the world we inhabit. Avant-garde artist Wenda Gu was born in China in 1955 and was a Red Guard member who painted revolutionary posters during Mao’s...

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June 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, summer 2007
Juliette Bianco, Assistant Director

In addition to presenting the green house, the Hood Museum of Art premieres another new Wenda Gu work this summer, the first in a series of large books. Wenda Gu: Retranslation and Rewriting Tang Dynasty Poetry will elucidate the themes explored in the hair monument by demonstrating, in book form, what happens when poetry is translated from one language to another and back again.

The book is based on his Forest...

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