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October 19, 2016
Artist Bahar Behbahani in her studio. Photo by Laura Fuchs.

An interview conducted in association with the Hood Downtown exhibition Bahar Behbahani: Let the Garden Eram Flourish, on view January 5, 2017, through March 12, 2017.

Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi: In 2013, you began the ongoing Persian Gardens series. What was the inspiration and motivation for it?

Bahar Behbahani: It started as an inquest of identity. As a person who grew up surrounded by poetry and carpet, one cannot deny...

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September 8, 2016
The Hood Downtown exhibition space, located at 53 Main Street Hanover, NH, will open to the public on September 16, 2016.

Hood Downtown is located at 53 Main Street, Hanover, New Hampshire

Join us as we celebrate the grand opening of Hood Downtown and its inaugural exhibition, Laetitia Soulier: The Fractal Architectures.

During the interval of our construction and reinstallation, Hood Downtown will present an ambitious series of exhibitions featuring contemporary artists from around the world. Like the Hood Museum of Art, Hood Downtown is free and open to the public.

15 September, Thursday...

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September 1, 2016
Laetitia Soulier: The Fractal Architectures on view at Hood Downtown through December 11, 2016. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2016
John Stomberg, Virginia Rice Kelsey 1961s Director

Fractals abound in nature, unfold mathematically, and have inspired a new generation of computer-based image-makers who bridge science and art to create abstract patterns. Laetitia Soulier is not one of them. Though she is deeply engaged in the visual possibilities that fractals offer, her artistic practice asserts human creativity and handcraft in a universe most often understood digitally, and...

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September 1, 2016
Mostar, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 1993.

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2016

The Hood Museum of Art has acquired the complete archive of James Nachtwey, an award-winning photojournalist who has spent over 35 years documenting conditions in some of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones. This acquisition brings to Dartmouth a photography collection of great historical significance, encompassing every...

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June 1, 2016
Ellsworth Kelly, Dartmouth Panels, 2012, painted aluminum. Gift of Debra and Leon Black, Class of 1973; 2012.35. Photo by Eli Burakian.

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2016
John Stomberg, Virginia Rice Kelsey 1961s Director

The energy of Ellsworth Kelly’s Dartmouth Panels startles me every time I walk by them, which, happily, is quite often. The five color panels looming over the Maffei Arts Plaza shift subtly throughout the day as the light changes, the hues sliding toward the blue end of their range early on and warming to the yellow end as the day proceeds—all...

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June 1, 2016
Alma Woodsey Thomas, Wind Dancing with Spring Flowers, 1969, acrylic on canvas. Purchased through a gift by exchange from Evelyn A. and William B. Jaffe, Class of 1964H; 2016.5. Photo courtesy of Connersmith Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2016

Alma Thomas (American, 1891–1978) based her paintings on nature. In the case of Wind Dancing with Spring Flowers, she was inspired by the circular formal gardens of Washington, D.C. Like the other Color Field painters in her city, including Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, Sam Gilliam, and Gene Davis, Thomas used the exuberance and power of color to carry the emotional content of her paintings. More...

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January 14, 2016
Ota Benga Panel Discussion Event

A Special Installation and Panel Discussion

Ota Benga (about 1883–1916) was a grossly mistreated and mostly neglected figure in the history of our country. He was taken prisoner in the Congo and transferred to the United States for display in the 1904 World’s Fair and then sent to live in the Bronx Zoo with the apes; he eventually committed suicide in 1916.

One hundred years later, Fred Wilson discovered in the Hood Museum of Art’s storage a forgotten object that the museum had nevertheless chosen to hold in its care: a head sculpted using a life cast, labeled “pygmy.”...

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December 7, 2015
Inventory: New Works and Conversations around African Art in the Friends and Cheatham Galleries. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

An Exhibition of Contemporary African Art from the Hood's Permanent Collection

Hood Quarterly, winter 2016
Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi, Curator of African Art

The Hood Museum of Art’s compelling new African art exhibition features impressive works by Ibrahim El Salahi, Lamidi Fakeye, Akin Fakeye, Owusu-Ankomah, Victor Ekpuk, Chike Obeagu, Candice Breitz, Nomusa Makhubu, Julien Sinzogan, Aida Muluneh, Halida Boughriet, Mario...

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December 7, 2015
Ice Cut (1932) by Eric Aho

Hood Quarterly, winter 2016
Katherine Hart, Senior Curator of Collections and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

The avanto, or hole in pond ice next to a Finnish sauna, has absorbed Vermont artist Eric Aho for the last nine years. In an ongoing series, he has focused on this subject for one or two paintings per year, and he has executed many watercolor studies (see the slideshow above), as well as smaller canvases and a series of monotypes. Aho, trained as a...

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December 6, 2015
outdoor_sculpture_brochure_-_option_2_for_homepage.jpg

Dartmouth College has a distinguished collection of works of public art throughout its campus. Ellsworth Kelly’s stunning Dartmouth Panels (2012)—a major site-specific work consisting of five monochromatic aluminum panels, each painted in a single block of radiant color—were designed for the east façade of the Hopkins Center’s Spaulding Auditorium, facing the Black Family Visual Arts Center. More recently, the College unveiled Kiki...

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