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March 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Brian Kennedy, Director

Although Jackson Pollock, like many great artists, was always reluctant to reveal any artistic influences on his work, it has long been known that he was powerfully affected by the Mexican muralists Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and José Clemente Orozco. Scholars had suggested over the years that Pollock must have seen the extraordinary mural cycle The Epic of American Civilization, which was painted...

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March 1, 2007
Subhankar Banerjee, Caribou Migration I, 2002, UltraChrome print. Purchased through the Charles F. Venrick 1936 Fund; 2006.61

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007
Katherine Hart, Associate Director and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming

Five years ago, Subhankar Banerjee spent almost two years in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, photographing this remote region in northeastern Alaska in all four seasons. His work there coincided with the push by oil companies and the current U.S. administration to open up the oil and gas reserves on the coastal plain to drilling. During his travels over nearly four thousand miles of the 19.5-million-acre...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

Gamin is the best-known work by Augusta Savage, the most admired and influential woman artist associated with the Harlem Renaissance. The life-size bronze version of this work (Schomburg Center, New York Public Library) won Savage the opportunity to study in Paris from 1929 to 1931.

Although Gamin has invoked for viewers the ubiquitous street boys of Harlem, Savage actually modeled the sculpture after her nephew and fellow Harlem resident Ellis Ford, who had earned...

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February 28, 2007

Hood Quarterly, spring 2007

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the making of samplers gave girls and young women the opportunity to practice a variety of embroidery stitches and to reinforce rudimentary lessons in spelling and penmanship.

This colorful, finely worked example by sixteen-year-old Apphia Amanda Young is typical of the samplers made in the vicinity of Canterbury, New Hampshire, from 1786 until at least 1838, the date of this work, which is the latest dated Canterbury example known. It...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

This beautifully carved and painted wooden mask by the Tongass Tlingit artist Norman G. Jackson brings to light a contemporary reinterpretation of traditional Northwest Coast themes and mythical stories. In much Northwest Coast art, painted, carved, or woven imagery is used during special occasions to proclaim and validate the status of ancestral clan crests representing mythical beings.

Jackson depicts the important mythic being Sharkman, who...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

This cradleboard reveals the exquisite beadwork that epitomizes the Kiowa style of decoration in Native American art. The Kiowa developed what is possibly the most prominently known baby carrier in Plains art, the lattice cradle or cradleboard (popularly known as the “papoose”), which spread to the Comanche, Cheyenne, and Dakota tribes of the Central Plains.

The baby carrier is structured on a modified V-shaped framework upon which a deep,...

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January 1, 2007

Hood Quarterly, winter 2007

The Hood Museum of Art’s recently acquired still life by Jan Davidsz de Heem is currently complemented by two other seventeenth-century Dutch paintings with similar subjects, by the artist’s teacher and most prominent pupil, respectively. The extraordinary works by Balthasar van der Ast and Abraham Mignon are on loan from the Currier Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Art and will remain on view through May. The installation is accompanied by...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara Thompson, Curator of African, Oceanic, and Native American Collections

Caché is a powerful life-sized sculpture by Alison Saar, who was artist-in-residence in Dartmouth College’s Department of Studio Art in 2002. This work presents an autobiographical narrative layered with African and African American artistic and cultural references.

Caché is composed of a carved wooden figure of a reclining female nude swathed...

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September 1, 2006

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2006
Barbara J. MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art

Henry “Mike” Bannarn was an influential, academically trained artist intimately associated with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1930s. In addition to his art, which was widely exhibited and admired in his day, he was revered for his role as a mentor to other African American artists. Together with fellow artist Charles Alston, he ran a studio/workshop at 306 West 141st Street (dubbed “306”), which served not only as a...

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June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004

This past term, twelve Dartmouth undergraduates gave up their Monday evenings for six consecutive weeks to participate in a non-credit course offered by the Hood. As a group, these individuals studied the museum’s small but distinguished collection of photographs, participated in discussions about the history of that medium, and became acquainted with the ethics of standard curatorial practice. Ultimately, these students helped strengthen the permanent holdings by advising the Hood on the acquisition of a single work of art. The work they...

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