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News

March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012
Michael Taylor, Director

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to announce the acquisition of Marcel Duchamp’s Boîte-en-valise (Box in a Valise), one of the most important and influential works of art of the twentieth century. Arguably modern art’s greatest iconoclast, Marcel Duchamp (American, born France, 1887–1968) devoted his entire career to debunking pre-existing ideas about art, which he believed should appeal to the intellect rather than the senses. This can be seen in...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012

Frank Weston Benson (1862–1951) was midway through his artistic career when he took up watercolor in 1921, but he adapted to the medium quickly and went on to create a large body of work that won him critical favor and swift sales. In this virtuosic example he captures the shimmering effects of dappled sunlight on his beloved summer home, Wooster Farm, on the island of North Haven in Penobscot Bay, Maine. Benson purchased the property and its large, late-eighteenth-century house in 1901. He had by then established...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

The estate of Evelyn Stefannson Nef recently made a bequest of two whalebone sculptures by the Inuit artist Karoo Ashevak to the Hood Museum of Art. Hailed as the most innovative and important Inuit sculptor of his generation, Ashevak was born in 1940 and lived in Taloyoak, Nunavut (formerly Spence Bay, Northwest Territories), the northernmost community on the...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

Through the generosity of Everett Parker, Class of 1952, and his two sons, David and William—also Dartmouth graduates—the Hood Museum of Art was able to add an important painting to its extensive collection of works by Paul Sample, Dartmouth Class of 1920 and artist-in-residence at the college from 1938 until 1962. Sample gained particular acclaim for his scenes of rural life in New Hampshire and Vermont, especially in winter. Such images have long held special significance and...

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September 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, autumn/winter 2011-12

This past year, along with many generous individual donations of works of art, the Hood Museum of Art received a number of significant group gifts. These works from patrons and donors will add significantly to both our contemporary and our photography collections. In addition to the gifts listed here, we also received a gift of five works from the Sam...

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March 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2011

James Peale (1749–1831) was one of the earliest and most talented professional painters in America to specialize in still life. He was the younger brother and pupil of Charles Willson Peale, the patriarch of Philadelphia’s most distinguished family of painters. James Peale first gained recognition for his portraits in miniature and did not begin to paint still lifes regularly until late in his career, around 1820. This harmonious example...

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March 1, 2011

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2011

Giovanni Battista Salvi, called il Sassoferrato (1609–1665), was born in the small town of that name in central Italy and apparently apprenticed in Rome with Domenichino (1581–1641), whose brilliant palette and clearly defined forms he was to incorporate in his work. The younger artist’s paintings have elements in common with other classically trained painters, but the single most powerful influence on Sassoferrato was Raphael (1483–1520). Few public commissions by...

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March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

This past November, the museum lost a valued and respected employee, Phil Langan. In his role as a visitor services and security staff member over the last four and a half years, Phil was a welcoming and gracious advocate for the museum. Prior to working at the Hood, Phil had a long and illustrious career in the field of sports information at such institutions as Harvard University, Ithaca College, Princeton University, Cornell University...

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March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

Harry T. Lewis Jr., Dartmouth Class of 1955, has made the generous gift of Allan Houser’s Taza, a major bronze sculpture cast from a piece originally carved in Indiana limestone in 1991. This is the second important gift of a Houser sculpture by a Dartmouth alumnus in recent years, following the 2007 gift of the large-scale bronze Peaceful Serenity (1992) by...

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March 1, 2010

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2010

This bronze relief by the renowned American realist Thomas Eakins (below) is an ecorché—a depiction that shows the muscles of a body without skin. In a tradition dating back at least to the Renaissance and widely adopted in French academies in the nineteenth century, such renderings served as important tools in teaching anatomy. This expertly modeled relief depicts Josephine, a beloved mare who belonged to...

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