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News

March 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, spring 2013
Stacey Sell ’85, Associate Curator of Old Master Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

The Hood recently received two major gifts from the family of Adolph Weil Jr., Class of 1935, and his wife, Jean K. Weil. Albrecht Dürer’s engraving Saint Jerome in His Study  (1514) and Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn’s etching The Three...

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January 1, 2013
April Gornik, Untitled (Desert Vista), 1980

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013

April Gornik (American, born 1953) is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential painters working today. She is best known for her monumental landscape paintings, which are fictional evocations of nature rather than imitations of the natural world. In a recent interview with Michael Taylor, director of the Hood Museum of Art, Gornik described Untitled (Desert Vista) as “a seminal painting for...

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January 1, 2013

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013
Tricia Y. Paik ’91, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Saint Louis Art Museum

This fall, Dartmouth College unveiled a monumental wall sculpture by leading American artist Ellsworth Kelly. Commissioned by Leon Black ’73 and his wife, Debra Black, Dartmouth Panels, a multicolored, site-specific work, was conceived in conjunction with the new Black Family Visual Arts Center, also dedicated this fall and made possible by a $48...

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January 1, 2013
Faith Ringgold, People’s Flag Show, 1970, offset lithograph. Purchased through the Mrs. Harvey P. Hood W’18 Fund; 2012.16. © Faith Ringgold 1970.

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to add to its collection two important works on paper by the celebrated African American artist Faith Ringgold (Amercian, born 1930). Ringgold is best known for her decades-long series of narrative quilts, in which she fuses her training in the fine arts with the quilt-making and storytelling traditions of her family and heritage. This important body of work was preceded by a series of posters and paintings Ringgold made in the 1960s and early...

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January 1, 2013
Marguerite Thompson Zorach, Mountain Stream, about 1917, oil on canvas. Purchased through the Katharine T. and Merrill G. Beede 1929 Fund and the Florence and Lansing Porter Moore 1937 Fund; 2012.42.

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013

Marguerite Thompson Zorach (American, 1887–1968) began her career at the forefront of American modernism, having circulated in avant-garde circles from 1908 to 1911 in Paris and, following her return to the United States in 1912, in New York. She incorporated into her personal style aspects of cubism, fauvism, and German expressionism, with its emphasis on the spiritual in nature. Reflecting her deep connection to the outdoors, she often painted abstracted, Arcadian landscapes that...

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January 1, 2013
Jacques Bellange, The Raising of Lazarus, about 1612–16, etching and engraving, only state. Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund, the Class of 1935 Memorial Fund, and the Olivia H. Parker and John O. Parker ’58 Acquisition Fund; 2012.4

Hood Quarterly, winter 2013

This intricate work, with its spot-lit figures against richly nuanced tones of grey, is thought to be possibly Jacques Bellange’s last plate and exemplifies the artist’s rich and sophisticated etching technique. The images shows the moment when Lazarus’s burial clothes are removed and many present are turning their heads away or shielding their noses from the stench. The two most prominent female figures here are...

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September 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2012
Juliette Bianco, Assistant Director

Denver-based multimedia artist Stacey Steers conceived her Night Hunter House around her sixteen-minute handmade film, shot in 35mm color, titled Night Hunter (2011). The film, incorporated into the house itself, is composed of more than four thousand collages, an intensely laborious process that Steers completed over a four-year period. The music and sound from...

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June 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, summer 2012

Since 2002, the Hood Museum of Art has offered Dartmouth students a non-curricular seminar titled Museum Collecting 101, which gives them the opportunity to learn about the museum’s acquisition policy and also the criteria a curator uses to evaluate works for purchase.The course culminates in the students’ selection of a photograph for the museum’s holdings.

In 2009, the subject of the class was documentary photography, and students that year were asked to think about a number...

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June 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, summer 2012

Angelica Kauffman (1741–1807) was a prolific and successful portrait and history painter who worked primarily in London and Rome in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. She attracted impressive international commissions from prominent patrons throughout eastern and western Europe. A founding member of England’s Royal Academy, she was accepted into the academies in Florence, Bologna, and Rome as well.

Among her many paintings...

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March 1, 2012

Hood Quarterly, spring 2012
Michael Taylor, Director

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to announce the acquisition of Marcel Duchamp’s Boîte-en-valise (Box in a Valise), one of the most important and influential works of art of the twentieth century. Arguably modern art’s greatest iconoclast, Marcel Duchamp (American, born France, 1887–1968) devoted his entire career to debunking pre-existing ideas about art, which he believed should appeal to the intellect rather than the senses. This can be seen in...

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