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September 1, 2014
Abastenia St. Leger Eberle, Hurdy Gurdy Dancer

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

Abastenia St. Leger Eberle (1878–1942) is best known for having created animated sculptures that reflect her interest in the everyday lives of immigrants in New York’s Lower East Side. She was particularly drawn to female subjects, especially young girls at play. In Hurdy Gurdy, which she modeled around 1909, Eberle rejected the static forms and grand subjects she had been exposed to at New York’s Art Students...

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June 1, 2014

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004

This untitled work of a mounted Cheyenne warrior dodging rifle bullets is one of the strongest images from the ledger book of the late actor Vincent Price, who collected this rare collection of eighty-six ledger drawings in the early 1960s. The drawings in the Vincent Price Ledger Book, dating from about 1875 to 1878, primarily depict the exploits of Cheyenne warriors during the conflicts of the Indian Wars, when warrior artists used new materials to chronicle the tumultuous changes in Plains life following contact...

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June 1, 2014
Chuck Close, Self-Portrait Screenprint 2012, in About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art.

Hood Quarterly, summer 2014


The mammoth heads that have been the exclusive subject of Chuck Close’s paintings and prints since the 1960s have redefined portraiture during the second half of the twentieth century. Close’s subjects are his family, his friends, himself, and fellow artists, whose faces are shown close-up and rendered through his distinct, meticulous marks. The artist begins by taking black-and-white or color Polaroid photographs of his subjects, which are carefully covered with a grid pattern...

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June 1, 2014
Owusu-Ankomah, Starkid, 2007, acrylic on canvas. Purchased through the Mrs. Harvey P. Hood W’18 Fund, the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Jaffe Hall Fund, and the Alvin and Mary Bert Gutman ’40 Acquisition Fund; 2014.14.

Hood Quarterly, summer 2014

Owusu-Ankomah (born 1956) is a Ghanaian-born artist based in Bremen, Germany, who is well known for his excellent draftsmanship, command of form, and understanding of color—attributes evident in Starkid, a recent acquisition by the Hood. This vivid acrylic-on-canvas work features three muscular male figures, along with a cluster of Adinkra and symbols invented by the artist. The three figures are...

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June 1, 2014

Vietnam: The Real War, Photographs from the Associated Press

Hood Quarterly, summer 2014

Last year, the Associated Press in association with Abrams published a book that looks back at the remarkable photographs taken by AP photographers during the Vietnam War. Titled Vietnam: The Real War, this compilation of photographs from the 1950s...

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March 1, 2014
“Perdido,” a 1978 sculpture by Clement Meadmore

Hood Quarterly, spring 2014

The Australian-born artist Clement Meadmore (1929–2005) is best known for large-scale outdoor sculptures that transform hulking lengths of COR-TEN steel into abstract artworks of arresting fluidity and lightness. In the 1940s, Meadmore studied aeronautical engineering and industrial design at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia and initially pursued a career as a furniture designer. In 1953, he decided to become a sculptor and moved to Sydney to pursue his...

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February 28, 2014

Hood Quarterly, spring 2014

The tension between visual punch and global industrial “documentation” is a signature of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s work, and the Hood’s recent acquisition is a stunning example of this. In this photograph, Burtynsky explores the interconnectedness between industrial progress, geological history, and social human history through images of the marks we leave upon the Earth as a result of all three.

The Panna Meena stepwell was possibly built...

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February 28, 2014

Hood Quarterly, spring 2014

The influential and visionary painter Jennifer Bartlett first entered onto the contemporary art scene in the early 1970s with installations of small steel plates coated with white baked enamel, painted with fastidious configurations of dots, and then arranged in grids. Such plate compositions as Rhapsody, first shown in 1976, launched her career but certainly have not come to define it. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Bartlett’s work evolved away from the obsessive control...

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January 6, 2014
Richard Westall, Ophelia, 1793, oil on canvas. Gift of Henry H. Erbe III, Class of 1984, and Margaret Trevisani Erbe, Tuck 1989; 2013.27

Hood Quarterly, winter 2014

This past spring, the museum received an important English eighteenth-century painting as a gift from longtime patrons and supporters Henry H. Erbe III, Class of 1984, and Margaret Trevisani Erbe, Tuck 1989. Ophelia depicts the ill-fated maiden in Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet; it was commissioned by the British print publisher John Boydell as part of a project to promote English art through...

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January 6, 2014

Hood Quarterly, winter 2014

José Clemente Orozco (1883–1949), one of Mexico’s most influential muralists, painted this canvas at the beginning of his second and longest stay in the United States, which extended from 1927 to 1934, the year he completed his monumental mural at Dartmouth College, The Epic of American Civilization. Before arriving in the states, Orozco’s work as a muralist...

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