We are expanding! Check out our programming while the museum is closed.

News

June 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, summer 2004

This past term, twelve Dartmouth undergraduates gave up their Monday evenings for six consecutive weeks to participate in a non-credit course offered by the Hood. As a group, these individuals studied the museum’s small but distinguished collection of photographs, participated in discussions about the history of that medium, and became acquainted with the ethics of standard curatorial practice. Ultimately, these students helped strengthen the permanent holdings by advising the Hood on the acquisition of a single work of art. The work they...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Terry Adkins was the Artist-in-Residence at Dartmouth College during the summer of 2003. A memorable exhibition of his work took place in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries in Hopkins Center at that time, and Still (2000) was a centerpiece of that project.

Adkins is a well-respected sculptor whose installations and assemblages are characterized by a profound sensitivity to found objects and a deep, highly personal appreciation for African American history. This alluring floor piece combines...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Last year, Alison Saar was the Artist-in-Residence at Dartmouth College. In conjunction with that prestigious role, an impressive exhibition of Saar’s sculptures and prints was held by the Studio Art Exhibition Program in the Jaffe-Friede and Strauss Galleries in Hopkins Center (April 1–May 4, 2003). During this period, she further contributed to the vital cultural life of the college by informally advising the Studio Art Department’s undergraduate majors,...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Contemporary artist Kara Walker is known for her highly charged silhouetted visual narratives of masters and slaves in the pre–Civil War South. One of her primary artistic themes is the sexual domination of female black slaves by white masters; through images of these graphic violations, she evokes the enormity of the crime committed against enslaved Africans and their descendents.

This sensitively...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Since the 1960s, Malick Sidibé (born 1935) has photographed the making of modern Mali in the streets, nightclubs, and photo studios of Bamako. In his early work, Sidibé captured snapshot images of young Malians rejoicing in their newly created, Western-influenced cultural identities during the post-independence era. In more recent years, however, Sidibé has turned to the staged setting of a photo studio, shifting his role from a documentarian to an...

Read more.
January 1, 2004

Hood Quarterly, winter 2004

Double Fuse (2003), by the Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu, blends drawing, painting, and cut-out fragments of imagery from fashion, wildlife, travel, and motorsports magazines into seductive and powerful women who confront Western stereotypes and representations of native, marginalized, and non-European women. Upon closer inspection, however, the incongruity of shapes, sizes, textures, materials, and colors create figures that are more reminiscent of...

Read more.
September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

School at Fort Marion is one of three recent acquisitions of Plains ledger drawings from the Mark Lansburgh collection. In this work, the Cheyenne warrior-artist Chief Killer (1849–1922) depicts a classroom scene of Native American captives, including Chief Killer and other well-known ledger artists, being schooled by volunteer teachers during their internment at Fort Marion from 1875 to 1878. The drawing, the earliest Native American work on paper...

Read more.
September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Louis-Léopold Boilly (1761–1845) first established his reputation as an accomplished portraitist and genre painter at the Paris Salon exhibitions during the French Revolution (1789–99). The painting that brought him his greatest success was the Gathering of Artists in Isabey’s Studio exhibited in the 1798 Salon (and now in the Musée du Louvre).

It was accompanied by a drawing that Boilly evidently intended as another homage to his friend Jean-Baptiste Isabey (1767–1855), a renowned master draftsman. The highly finished portrayal...

Read more.
September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

Drawing for “Evening” is the first drawing by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926) to enter the museum’s collection. This remarkably innovative study for a print dates from around 1879–80, which was an especially formative and experimental period in Cassatt’s career. It was in 1879 that Cassatt, arguably the most celebrated American woman artist of the nineteenth century, first exhibited with the French Impressionists and...

Read more.
September 1, 2003

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2003

In mid-nineteenth-century America, drawing was an important skill enjoyed by many amateur women and schoolgirls, particularly those privileged to study at private female academies. Along with music, needlework, and fine penmanship, the ability to draw conveyed one’s proper education and appreciation for beauty—qualities highly valued in a prospective wife, mother, or future teacher.

The Hood Museum of Art is delighted to have received as a gift from Professor of Theater Margaret E. Spicer a collection of delightful mid-nineteenth-century...

Read more.

Pages

Close
Hood Museum