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June 1, 2015
Chike Obeagu, City Scape and City Dwellers II

Hood Quarterly, summer 2015

Chike Obeagu is known for his expressive mixed-media paintings that explore social experiences of the everyday. City Scape and City Dwellers II represents his most successful attempt to date to push the formal and conceptual boundaries of his subject matter, the materiality of his medium, and photo-collage technique. Obeagu presents a condensed yet an all-encompassing view of Abuja, Nigeria’s capital city, where...

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April 17, 2015
Henry Ossawa Tanner, Étaples and the Canche River at Dusk, about 1918

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Born in Pittsburgh to a former slave and a pastor in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937) developed into a painter of international renown. He spent most of his youth in Philadelphia, where he honed his early naturalistic style at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under the mentorship of...

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April 17, 2015
Red and Red, 2014, oil on canvas

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

In the paintings that she has made in the past year in her New York studio, including Red and Red, American artist Pat Steir (born 1938) has poured, splashed, and dripped pigment thinned with turpentine onto vertically hung canvases to create luscious washes and...

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March 1, 2015
Brian Ulrich, Edinburgh, UK

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

The Hood Museum of Art recently received a major gift of contemporary photography from Nancy and Thomas F. O’Neil III, a Dartmouth alumnus from the Class of 1979. This outstanding group of thirty-nine photographs by seventeen photographers substantially enhances the museum’s growing collection of recent...

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January 15, 2015
Gar Waterman, Feral Seed

Hood Quarterly, winter 2015

A member of Dartmouth’s Class of 1978, Gar Waterman is best known for his meticulously hand-crafted sculptures and large-scale public art projects that take their inspiration from natural forms, such as plants, insects, shells, fish, nudibranchs, and other marine creatures. The youngest son of the pioneering oceanographic filmmaker Stan Waterman, Class of 1946, the artist grew up exploring the Maine coast and the barrier reefs of the South Pacific, which he visited between the ages...

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January 15, 2015
Nomusa Makhubu, Umasifanisane I (Comparison I)

Hood Quarterly, winter 2015

In Self-Portrait, Nomusa Makhubu (born 1984) presents a haunting vision of South Africa’s past by embedding her portrait on several colonial-type photographs. The Cape Town–based South African artist developed the visually compelling and evocative photographic series, comprised of thirteen prints, between 2007 and 2013. It...

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January 15, 2015
Gerry Williams, vase

Hood Quarterly, winter 2015

The Hood Museum of Art recently received a remarkable gift of 118 works of art originally collected by the late Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Dartmouth Class of 1947, and donated in their memory by their children, Susan E. Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl. Assembled over a period of 60 years, the works range from Old Master prints and drawings to works on paper, paintings,...

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September 1, 2014
Kiki Smith, My Blue Lake, 1995, photogravure, à la poupée inkling, and lithograph in 3 colors on mold made En Tout Cas paper. © 1994 Kiki Smith/Universal Limited Art Editions

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

Kiki Smith is among the most admired and significant American artists of her generation. As a feminist artist and activist, she has created a large number of highly memorable sculptures, drawings, collages, and prints in which the human body is imbued with political significance. Smith has often used her own face and body as material for her work, and this practice continues in My Blue Lake, her most important...

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September 1, 2014
selma march

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014
Amelia Kahl, Coordinator of Academic Programming

I was drawn to that specific image because the Hood’s collection includes many civil rights-era pieces, but few of them actually illustrate what civil rights activism looked like. Karales’s photo, with other Karales photos in the series, provides a context for the rest of the Hood’s civil rights collection. Since our group had the opportunity to visit the galleries from which we were evaluating photographs, I’m happy to say...

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September 1, 2014
inventory_6.jpg

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2014

V12 Laraki (2013) is the most important work to date by the African-born Belgian artist Eric van Hove. This stunning sculpture brings together Western industrial tradition, rep- resented in the car engine, and more than a thousand years of craftsmanship heritage of the Maghreb region in Africa. Created in collaboration with 43 talented craftsmen from across Morocco who worked consistently for nine months, the work...

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