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May 1, 2015
Allan Houser, Morning Solitude

Dartmouth College Celebrates Sculpture of Allan Houser

Allan Houser (1914–1994), one of the best-known Native American artists of the twentieth century, continues to be an influential figure in the field of Southwestern sculpture in the United States. This May, the Hood Museum of Art installs five sculptures by Houser in the Maffei Arts Plaza, adjacent to the museum and the Black Family Visual Arts Center. These works represent a cross-section of his large three-dimensional work from the years 1986 to 1992. There will also be two...

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April 17, 2015
Our Senior Interns - Community of Learners

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Our Senior Interns
Olivia Field, Class of 2015, Public Relations, Katherine Conroy Intern

The 2014–15 senior interns for the Hood Museum of Art have embarked on a journey through the behind-the-scenes world of museums.

Our curatorial interns, Elissa Watters,...

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April 17, 2015
Henry Ossawa Tanner, Étaples and the Canche River at Dusk, about 1918

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Born in Pittsburgh to a former slave and a pastor in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859–1937) developed into a painter of international renown. He spent most of his youth in Philadelphia, where he honed his early naturalistic style at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under the mentorship of...

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April 17, 2015
Red and Red, 2014, oil on canvas

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

In the paintings that she has made in the past year in her New York studio, including Red and Red, American artist Pat Steir (born 1938) has poured, splashed, and dripped pigment thinned with turpentine onto vertically hung canvases to create luscious washes and...

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April 17, 2015
River Wandjina, 2004, gelatin silver print

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Water is ubiquitous in our lives. We use it for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and recreation. It affects where we choose to live and is integral to many people’s work. This exhibition explores water’s impact on human life and humanity’s impact on water.

Drawn primarily from the Hood’s permanent collection, the exhibition comprises over two dozen works from across the globe. The majority are 20th– and...

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April 17, 2015
Dartmouth’s introductory French II class works in the exhibition About Face

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

Organized in collaboration with nine Dartmouth students, About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art explores the extraordinary range and global diversity of self-portraiture in contemporary art. Building on the success of recent student-driven Hood exhibitions, such as The Expanding Grid and...

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April 16, 2015
Bird with Spread Wings

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

The Hood Museum of Art possesses over twelve hundred works by Native American artists from the Arctic and Subarctic regions of Canada, Alaska, and Greenland. A new installation now on view in the Kim Gallery showcases these collections, highlighting in particular two important recent gifts to the collection. In 2011, Jane and Raphael Bernstein donated nearly forty prints, drawings, and sculptures, as well as numerous...

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March 1, 2015

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015
Juliette Bianco, Interim Director

All visitors to the Hood Museum of Art are confronted, and most often awed, by the magnificent ninth-century BCE stone carvings in Kim Gallery from the ancient city of Nimrud that depict the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II, attended by both human and supernatural protectors. These objects—just six out of the nearly 65,000 that are preserved in the museum’s collection—are treasured by all who behold them as a direct link to humans’ individual...

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March 1, 2015
Market Day, 2007, China marker on archival pigment print

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

This exhibition presents recent work by Washington, D.C.–based Victor Ekpuk. Born in 1964, Ekpuk trained at Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, in southwestern Nigeria, where he was first exposed to the possibilities of drawing. He developed his minimalist approach of reducing form to constituent lines while working as a cartoonist for Daily Times, a leading Nigerian newspaper, in the 1990s. A ceaseless experimentalist with...

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March 1, 2015
Small ukara with minute patterned design and Omu Aro symbol

Hood Quarterly, spring 2015

This exhibition examines the ukara cloth of the Ekpe secret society, a multi-ethnic all-male association in southeastern Nigeria and western Cameroon, exploring both the longstanding cultural practice the cloth represents and the artistic process involved in its creation. The cloth is made of plain cotton but transformed into a ritual object when nsibidi symbols are inscribed onto it through indigo dyeing. Nsibidi...

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