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The Women of Shin Hanga

The Judith and Joseph Barker Collection of Japanese Prints

April 06, 2013, through July 28, 2013
Kobayakawa Kiyoshi, Modern Fashions: No. 1 Tipsy

Kobayakawa Kiyoshi, Modern Fashions: No. 1 Tipsy, 1930, woodblock print. Promised gift of Judith and Joseph Barker, Dartmouth Class of 1966. Photograph by Bruce M. White, 2012. 

Itō Shinsui, Eyebrow Pencil

Itō Shinsui, Eyebrow Pencil, 1928, woodblock print. Promised gift of Judith and Joseph Barker, Dartmouth Class of 1966. Photograph by Bruce M. White, 2012. 

Hashiguchi Goyō, Woman Combing Her Hair

Hashiguchi Goyō, Woman Combing Her Hair, 1920, woodblock print. Promised gift of Judith and Joseph Barker, Dartmouth Class of 1966. Photograph by Bruce M. White, 2012. 

Torii Kotondo, Morning Hair

Torii Kotondo, Morning Hair, 1930, woodblock print. Promised gift of Judith and Joseph Barker, Dartmouth Class of 1966. Photograph by Bruce M. White, 2012. 

Itō Shinsui, Hair, 1952

Itō Shinsui, Hair, 1952, woodblock print. Promised gift of Judith and Joseph Barker, Dartmouth Class of 1966. Photograph by Bruce M. White, 2012. 

Kitano Tsunetomi, Heron Maiden

Kitano Tsunetomi, Heron Maiden, about 1925, woodblock print. Promised gift of Judith and Joseph Barker, Dartmouth Class of 1966. Photograph by Bruce M. White, 2012. 

In an attempt to revive traditional Japanese woodblock prints, artists of the shin hanga (new print) movement were forced to reconcile approaches to female subjects developed over the previous two centuries with the impact of modernity on both women and the arts in early-twentieth-century Japan. To ensure the contemporary relevancy of their work, the subjects they depicted ranged between deeply conservative and highly provocative conceptions of femininity, with demure, self-effacing geisha representing the former and so-called modern girls, known for their Westernized appearance and morally suspect lifestyles, representing the latter. By retaining production methods honed by their predecessors, they cultivated audiences in Japan and America who appreciated the unique legacies of the Japanese woodblock print tradition. These strategies successfully ensured a place for shin hanga depictions of women in an environment where new print media and styles imported from the West competed with Japan's most treasured visual traditions. The results of their efforts are amply apparent in this exhibition. With ninety woodblock prints from the Judith and Joseph Barker Collection, The Women of Shin Hanga showcases two and a half centuries of Japanese print designers' engagement with female subjects.
This exhibition was organized by the Hood Museum of Art and was generously supported by Yoko Otani Homma and Shunichi Homma M.D., Class of 1977, the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund, and the Eleanor Smith Fund.
Curated by Allen Hockley, Associate Professor of Art History
This exhibition was organized by the Hood Museum of Art and was generously supported by Yoko Otani Homma and Shunichi Homma M.D., Class of 1977, the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund, and the Eleanor Smith Fund.

Press release 

PDF icon Press Release (478.57 KB)

Related events 

Apr 05
OPENING LECTURE AND RECEPTION | Who Are the Women of Shin Hanga?
Apr 18
LUNCHTIME GALLERY TALK | When Tradition Encounters Modernity
Apr 20
Hood Museum of Art
2:00PM
TOUR | The Women of Shin Hanga
Apr 24
ADULT WORKSHOP | Exploring Japanese Woodblock Prints
Apr 26
Hood Museum of Art
5:00PM
LECTURE | Modern Girls, Eternal Spring?
May 04
FAMILY WORKSHOP | Japanese Woodblock Prints
May 18
Hood Museum of Art
2:00PM
TOUR | The Women of Shin Hanga
May 29
Translated by Anthony H. Chambers
Jun 08
Hood Museum of Art
2:00PM
TOUR | The Women of Shin Hanga
Jun 19
Barbara MacAdam, Jonathan L. Cohen Curator of American Art
Jun 21
In conjunction with The Hood Museum's The Women of Shin Hanga, take a tour and special woodblock printmaking demonstration
Jul 13
Hood Museum of Art
2:00PM
The Judith and Joseph Barker Collection of Japanese Prints
Jul 16
Allen Hockley, Associate Professor of Art History, Dartmouth College, and curator of The Women of Shin Hanga
Jul 17
This discussion-based workshop introduces participants to the beauty and complexity of Japanese woodblock prints.
Jul 24
In conjunction with The Women of Shin Hanga exhibition at The Hood Museum of Art

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