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Past Exhibitions

Broken Bodies

Icons of Sexual Violence

20
May 28, 2004, through July 11, 2004

The Photographer’s Eye

May 08, 2004, through June 13, 2004

Crossing Currents

The Synergy of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Ouattara Watts

March 30, 2004, through June 06, 2004

This exhibition focuses upon a small selection of works by the African American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and the Cote d'Ivoirian artist Ouattara Watts. It addresses Basquiat and Watts's personal negotiations with their own multicultural identities, experiences, and evocations, which culminate in their intense artistic searches for belonging in a transnational world.

Rococo to Modernism

European Drawings and Watercolors from the Permanent Collection and Dartmouth's Alumni

March 30, 2004, through May 30, 2004

Rococo to Modernism presents forty-two drawings and watercolors created by celebrated artists from the early eighteenth through the early twentieth century, including Eugène Delacroix, Vincent van Gogh, Vasily Kandinsky, Adolph Menzel, Pablo Picasso, Thomas Rowlandson, and Francesco Solimena, among others. Organized by Bart Thurber, the Hood's curator of European art, this exhibition of preparatory sketches, working drafts, and finished compositions reflects a mixture of genres including figure studies, portraits, landscapes, and historical subjects. Rococo to Modernism provides visitors with a rare opportunity to view selected works on paper from the Hood's European holdings alongside important contributions from the private collections of some of Dartmouth's alumni. While a number of these drawings and watercolors have been exhibited periodically at the Hood and have been lent to other institutions, they have never before comprised a comprehensive exhibition.

Playing Around with Art

19
April 27, 2004, through May 23, 2004

Masters of the Medium

European Drawings from the Collection of the Ackland Art Museum

March 30, 2004, through May 23, 2004

This exhibition highlights seventy-three works on paper dating from about 1500 to 1920 from a significant collection of nearly three hundred objects by a long lineage of artists, including figure studies by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and Hermann Max Pechstein, historical representations by François Boucher and Käthe Kollwitz, landscapes by Allart van Everdingen and Egon Schiele, and portraits by Sir Thomas Lawrence and Max Beckmann.

Aside from being significant works in their own right, these drawings often functioned in the creative process as means to another end. Co-curator Carolyn Wood of the Ackland Art Museum explains that "artists of the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries typically used drawings as vehicles for exploring and developing their ideas for the designs of commissioned [works] in other media, such as paintings, prints, and sculptures." Particular examples include Jean-Baptiste Greuze's A Violent Family Scene of the 1780s. Specializing in moralizing scenes of bourgeois family emotions, Greuze often composed a friezelike arrangement of figures with theatrical poses and expressions. Executed first in graphite and pen and ink to delineate at least ten... read more

Anthropological Perspectives on Ritual Objects

April 03, 2004, through May 02, 2004

Timepieces

Perceptions of Natural and Manmade Time

18
March 30, 2004, through April 25, 2004

Sexes in the City

Exploring Urban Men and Women through Five Centuries of Popular Prints

17
January 30, 2004, through March 28, 2004

Lateral Thinking

Art of the 1990s

January 17, 2004, through March 14, 2004

This extraordinary exhibition features forty contemporary artists from North, South, and Central America, Cuba, Africa, China, and Europe, including Matthew Barney, Vanessa Beecroft, Roman de Salvo, Zhang Huan, William Kentridge, Byron Kim, Jean Lowe, Vik Muniz, and Cindy Sherman, many of whose works have not appeared in the Upper Valley before. The exhibition defies categorization by style, school, or medium, but a number of key ideas recur throughout, such as the body; the construction of identity (gender, personal, social, or ethnic); the role of the artist; and one's relationship to everyday occurrences and objects.

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