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Past Exhibitions

Eric Aho

Ice Cuts

January 09, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Eric Aho, Ice Cut (Arctic Sky), 2015

Vermont-based artist Eric Aho’s series of Ice Cuts paintings is inspired by the hole cut in the ice in front of a Finnish sauna, an aspect of Finnish culture that Aho’s family has maintained to this day. Intended for an icy immersion following the heat of the sauna, the avanto, as it is called in Finnish, underscores and personalizes the inherent contrasts in nature. Aho began the Ice Cuts series nine years ago, making one painting a year of the dark void produced by the act of sawing into the thick ice. This exhibition is the first to concentrate on the Ice Cuts paintings he has created to date. The central abstract form in these compositions provides the structure for experimentation with paint texture, surface, and subtly nuanced color, lending these frozen scenes both an austere beauty and a particular vibrancy. This exhibition brings together the major paintings in the series to date and smaller, related works on paper to offer unique insight into the artistic process.

Contemporary Abstraction

Works from the Hood Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection

January 04, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Pat Steir, Red and Red

This exhibition features paintings by both American and Indigenous Australian artists and reveals the strength of the Hood’s contemporary holdings, including a selection of recent acquisitions with new work by Pat Steir, Colleen Randall, and Brenda Garand.

The Concinnitas Portfolio

January 05, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Simon Kirwan Donaldson, English, born 1957 Ampere's Law, number 3 of 10, from the portfolio Concinnitas 2014 Aquatint on Rives BFK paper Purchased through the Phyllis and Bertram Geller 1937 Memorial Fund and the Anonymous Fund # 144

Concinnitas is a Latin term that connotes an elegant, skillful joining of elements. It was used by Renaissance scholar, artist, and architect Leon Battista Alberti (1404–1472) to describe the beauty found in the confluence of perfect uses of number, position, and outline. The Concinnitas project was a two-year collaborative venture between Parasol Press and Daniel Rockmore, professor of mathematics and computer science at Dartmouth. In 2012, Parasol commissioned ten mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists—including two Nobel Laureates and five Fields Medalists—to create etchings of the mathematical expression most meaningful to them. These formulae were then printed by the fine-art print shop Harlan and Weaver as aquatints, evoking the look of equations quickly and elegantly sketched in white chalk on a blackboard.

The 2015 Nepal Earthquake

Photographs by James Nachtwey and Kevin Bubriski

January 23, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Kevin Bubriski, Anisha Shresta is 7 years old and in the second grade. She and her brother Ganesh walk through the ruins in Charikot twice a day to get from their house to the school, 2015, archival pigment digital print. Courtesy of the artist. © Kevin B

In the spring of 2015, just days after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake shook Gorkha District and surrounding areas in Nepal, photojournalist James Nachtwey ’70 documented the immediate aftermath among these devastated communities, both in urban centers and in mountain villages only accessible by helicopter. Six weeks later, photographer Kevin Bubriski arrived in Kathmandu and captured the rebuilding of a city and the resilience of its people. A few of those images by each photographer are on view in this exhibition.

The Stahl Collection

August 01, 2015, through December 07, 2015
Georges Rouault, Amazone (Equestrian)

The Hood Museum of Art's striking installation of thirty prints, drawings, and ceramics from the recently donated Stahl collection presents a wonderful opportunity to learn from art objects chosen by passionate, discerning collectors. Assembled over a period of sixty years, these highlights include bold, socially critical German Expressionist prints by Max Beckmann, Ludwig Meidner, and Emil Nolde, complemented by early twentieth-century American works on paper in a social realist mode. A cornerstone of the Stahl collection, assembled over decades, is Georges Rouault’s poignant series of eight aquatints titled The Circus (Le Cirque), 1930. The installation also features late twentieth-century works by New Hampshire artists, including James Aponovich and pioneering ceramicists Gerry Williams and Edwin and Mary Scheier. These highlights are drawn from the 118 works donated by Susan E. Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl, the children of the original collectors, the late Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Dartmouth Class of 1947. The high quality of the works, combined with their strong thematic links to a wide range of academic fields, makes these new acquisitions... read more

Tradition and Transformation

Twentieth-Century Inuit Art from the Collection of the Hood Museum of Art

October 22, 2014, through December 06, 2015
carved whalebone inlaid with walrus ivory, baleen, and stone

The majority of artists in this installation represent a generation of Inuit from the arctic and subarctic regions of Canada who lived fully “on the land.” Several changes occurred during the mid-twentieth century that pressured the Inuit to change their traditional life ways by moving into settlements. Although the Inuit had been trading works they made out of a variety of materials since the time of contact, new visitors encouraged them to use their knowledge and skills to create work—in stone, fabric, drawings, and on paper—that would be oriented for a non-Inuit art market.

The majority of works in this installation were made by the first generation of Inuit artists to exhibit and sell their work to new markets in the south through art dealers and cooperatives. The objects they produced are remarkable works of art, widely sought after by collectors, and now in the collections of major museums all over the world. Most importantly, the production of this work created a vehicle for preserving cultural knowledge and sustaining tradition while innovating and creating new forms of expression.

Collecting and Sharing

Trevor Fairbrother, John T. Kirk, and the Hood Museum of Art

August 22, 2015, through December 06, 2015
McDermott & McGough, Keyhole

This exhibition features the collection of Trevor Fairbrother, an independent curator, and John T. Kirk, a scholar of early American decorative arts, who have donated important works in their collection to the museum. Emphasizing the Hood’s teaching mission, this exhibition is thematically organized and each section displays one work from the museum’s collection alongside those of the donors. These themes include Histories, Wonders, Goods, Marks, Geometries, Males, and Surfaces. The exhibition will showcase paintings, drawings, and sculpture alongside early American furniture and include works by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Joseph Beuys, Marsden Hartley, Mike Kelley, Sol Lewitt, Glenn Ligon, Catherine Opie, Elizabeth Peyton, John Singer Sargent, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Robert Wilson, and many others.

Canaletto's Vedute Prints

An Exhibition in Honor of Adolph Weil Jr.

August 01, 2015, through December 06, 2015
Giovanni Antonio Canal (Canaletto), Title Plate

Although the Italian eighteenth-century artist Antonio Canaletto is best known for his luminous, sweeping views of the Grand Canal and Piazza San Marco, the Vedute, a portfolio of prints made in the early 1740s, reveal another side of Venice. These scenes are intimate in scale and contain an extraordinary variety of subject matter, encompassing both real and imaginary views, from urban portraits to bucolic landscapes. This exhibition presents the full range of Canaletto’s Vedute project and celebrates the legacy of Adolph J. “Bucks” Weil, Class of 1935, an astute and generous collector who over his lifetime amassed one of the most impressive collections of Old Master prints in the country.

(Re)Imagining Home

91
October 17, 2015, through December 06, 2015

Home is a complex idea imbued with a variety of meanings and associations. This exhibition explores home as a mutable emotional and conceptual phenomenon inextricably linked to physical spaces. Home is constantly (re)imagined, subject to continual construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction both materially and in the mind. Homes are highly personalized spaces that represent personal narratives and inner lives and continually evolve as their inhabitants age or move. Whether actual or staged, physical or imagined, idyllic or in ruins, images of homes raise the questions: Where is home? What is home? Does (or can) home travel with you or is it something forever left behind?

The City as Memory Machine

August 29, 2015, through December 06, 2015

Life in the city is lived in daily patterns of mobility. Each day, most of us stroll past the same shops and cafés, or distractedly gaze across receding rooftops from the vantage of an elevated train. We often think of time spent in transit as lost time, life on the periphery of real living. But as the French anthropologist Marc Augé has shown us, traveling through the city is a practice of history and memory. Instead of life lost, cities unfold at the stop-and-go pace of a crowded bus line. Along the way, monuments to the city’s collective history spark personal, individualized memories. In those fleeting moments, as the bus rolls along, we may be struck by the memory of a childhood trip to Central Park or suddenly recall a moment of heartbreaking loss. On the commute, the past and the present intermingle in barely recognized flashes of illumination, all in the time it takes to glance up from the morning newspaper. 

In his ethnography of the Paris Metro, Marc Augé refers to the Metro map as a “memory machine,” arguing that each stop highlighted on the map indexes and generates individual and shared experiences of place. The works of art in this exhibition offer... read more

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