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Past Exhibitions

Crossing Currents

The Synergy of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Ouattara Watts

March 30, 2004, through June 06, 2004

This exhibition focuses upon a small selection of works by the African American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and the Cote d'Ivoirian artist Ouattara Watts. It addresses Basquiat and Watts's personal negotiations with their own multicultural identities, experiences, and evocations, which culminate in their intense artistic searches for belonging in a transnational world.

Anthropological Perspectives on Ritual Objects

April 03, 2004, through May 02, 2004

Lateral Thinking

Art of the 1990s

January 17, 2004, through March 14, 2004

This extraordinary exhibition features forty contemporary artists from North, South, and Central America, Cuba, Africa, China, and Europe, including Matthew Barney, Vanessa Beecroft, Roman de Salvo, Zhang Huan, William Kentridge, Byron Kim, Jean Lowe, Vik Muniz, and Cindy Sherman, many of whose works have not appeared in the Upper Valley before. The exhibition defies categorization by style, school, or medium, but a number of key ideas recur throughout, such as the body; the construction of identity (gender, personal, social, or ethnic); the role of the artist; and one's relationship to everyday occurrences and objects.

A Point of View

Africa on Display?

July 05, 2003, through February 22, 2004

In the usual museum setting, African art displays aim to enhance our understanding of the diverse cultures to which they belong. A Point of View addresses the idea that, by the very nature of museum viewing and displaying, African arts often can tell us more about ourselves and our relationships to other cultures than about the cultures they are meant to represent.

The Creative Journey of Nike Davies-Okundaye

November 16, 2002, through January 19, 2003

A rich slice of Yoruba culture offers a unique experience for visitors to the museum through January 19 in the form of batik textiles in Harrington Gallery. Although small in scale, this exhibition is large on life. Visitors entering the gallery are surrounded by the deep, calming shades of indigo—a traditional color used in the making of Nigerian textiles. These inspired works are created by internationally recognized Nigerian artist, musician, and dancer Nike Davies-Okundaye—a fascinating person in her own right. Offered as part of Davies­Okundaye's nine-day residency at Dartmouth College, the exhibition includes a video made at the artists' school for men and women in Nigeria that demonstrates the various methods and forms of creating batik.

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