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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Current Exhibitions

Jonathan Borofsky, Upside Down Flowers #2, 1976, oil on canvas. Lent by Trevor Fairbrother and John T. Kirk. © Jonathan Borofsky. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York
Jonathan Borofsky, Upside Down Flowers #2, 1976, oil on canvas. Lent by Trevor Fairbrother and John T. Kirk. © Jonathan Borofsky. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Giovanni Antonio Canal (Canaletto), La Libreria. V. (The Library, Venice) (detail), about 1735–41, etching on laid paper. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Gift of Jean K. Weil in memory of Adolph Weil Jr., Class of 1935; PR.997.5.37.
Giovanni Antonio Canal (Canaletto), La Libreria. V. (The Library, Venice) (detail), about 1735–41, etching on laid paper. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Gift of Jean K. Weil in memory of Adolph Weil Jr., Class of 1935; PR.997.5.37.

Georges Rouault, Amazone (Equestrian) from Le Cirque (The Circus), 1930, color aquatint. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Gift of Susan E. Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl in memory of their parents, Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Class of 1947; 2014.73.105
Georges Rouault, Amazone (Equestrian) from Le Cirque (The Circus), 1930, color aquatint. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Gift of Susan E. Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl in memory of their parents, Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Class of 1947; 2014.73.105

The exhibitions presented by the museum are intended to contribute to scholarship in art history and related disciplines and to offer insight into the artistic production of many different historical periods and cultures. In addition to ongoing displays from its permanent collection, the museum also presents a number of special exhibitions each year, covering a broad range of topics, as well as teaching exhibitions. Organized in conjunction with Dartmouth College courses, these exhibitions are intended to facilitate the curricular use of the museum's collections.

 

Collecting and Sharing: Trevor Fairbrother, John T. Kirk, and the Hood Museum of Art

August 22 through December 6, 2015

This exhibition features the collection of Trevor Fairbrother, an independent curator, and John T. Kirk, a scholar of early American decorative arts, who have donated important works in their collection to the museum. Emphasizing the Hood's teaching mission, this exhibition is thematically organized and each section displays one work from the museum's collection alongside those of the donors. These themes include Histories, Wonders, Goods, Marks, Males, Geometries, and Surfaces, and the exhibition will showcase paintings, drawings, photographs, and sculpture alongside early American furniture and include works by Andy Warhol, Marsden Hartley, Glenn Ligon, Carl Andre, Mike Kelley, Robert Wilson, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Richard Artschwager, Tom Wesselmann, Joseph Beuys, Catherine Opie, Elizabeth Peyton, Sol LeWitt, John O'Reilly, John Singer Sargent, and many others.

This exhibition is organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously supported by the Hansen Family Fund and the Bernard R. Siskind Fund.

 

Canaletto's Vedute Prints: An Exhibition in Honor of Adolph Weil Jr.

August 1 through December 6, 2015

Although the Italian eighteenth-century artist Antonio Canaletto is best known for his luminous, sweeping views of the Grand Canal and Piazza San Marco, the Vedute, a portfolio of prints made in the early 1740s, reveal another side of Venice. These scenes are intimate in scale and contain an extraordinary variety of subject matter, encompassing both real and imaginary views, from urban portraits to bucolic landscapes. This exhibition presents the full range of Canaletto's Vedute project and celebrates the legacy of Adolph J. "Bucks" Weil, Class of 1935, an astute and generous collector, who over his lifetime amassed one of the most impressive collections of Old Master prints in the country.

This exhibition is organized by the Hood Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, and generously supported by the William Chase Grant 1919 Memorial Fund.

 

The Stahl Collection

August 1 through December 6, 2015

The Hood Museum of Art's striking installation of thirty prints, drawings, and ceramics from the recently donated Stahl collection presents a wonderful opportunity to learn from art objects chosen by passionate, discerning collectors. Assembled over a period of sixty years, these highlights include bold, socially critical German Expressionist prints by Max Beckmann, Ludwig Meidner, and Emil Nolde, complemented by early-twentieth-century American works on paper in a social realist mode. A cornerstone of the Stahl collection is Georges Rouault’s series of eight aquatints, assembled over decades, that comprise his poignant series titled The Circus (Le Cirque), 1930. The installation also features late-twentieth-century works by New Hampshire artists, including James Aponovich and pioneering ceramicists Gerry Williams and Edwin and Mary Scheier.

These highlights are drawn from the 118 works donated by Susan E Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl, the children of the original collectors, the late Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Dartmouth Class of 1947. The high quality of the works, combined with their strong thematic links to a wide range of academic fields, make these new acquisitions prime candidates for the interdisciplinary, object-based teaching that is central to the Hood Museum of Art’s mission.

This exhibition was organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously support by the Harrington Gallery Fund.

 

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection

Ongoing

This exhibition explores the Hood Museum of Art's extraordinary collection of African weapons for the first time. It focuses on the aesthetic quality of the objects, and on the ways in which they reflect notions of masculinity, warriorhood, and ideal male beauty in traditional African societies. Because the weapons are in a Western museum's collection, the exhibition also considers Western notions of masculinity, as represented in the collecting practices of those Christian missionaries, colonial administrators, military officers, big game hunters, and explorers who acquired most of these weapons in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. Although the exhibition draws from several cultures in the five sub-regions of Africa, it is not a broad survey of African weapons. Instead, it presents exemplary highlights from the Hood's extensive collection, categorized as "offensive" and "defensive" weapons.

This exhibition is organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously supported by the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund.

 

A Space for Dialogue: Fresh Perspectives on the Permanent Collection from Dartmouth's Students

Ongoing
At the entrance to the museum


A Space for Dialogue is a unique opportunity within Dartmouth's senior internship program, which includes museum positions in curatorial, public relations, and educational work. Interns choose objects from the Hood's permanent collection, write descriptions of the objects, design a space, create a brochure, and conduct a public gallery presentation. The program also allows students to develop art projects and displays within the Hood Museum of Art and on the Dartmouth College campus, creating "spaces for dialogue" between works of art and their viewers.

A Space for Dialogue, founded with support from the Class of 1948, is made possible with generous endowments from the Class of 1967, Bonnie and Richard Reiss Jr. '66, and Pamela J. Joyner '79.

 

José Clemente Orozco: The Epic of American Civilization

Ongoing
Orozco Room, Baker Library, Dartmouth College


The Epic of American Civilization is an extensive mural cycle created by Mexican artist José Clemente Orozco between 1932 and 1934. The mural is composed of twenty-four distinct panels depicting the history of the Americas from the Aztec migration into Mexico to the industrialization of modern society. Located in the reserve corridor of Baker Library, now the Orozco Room, these scenes cover nearly 3,200 square feet of wall space. The Epic of American Civilization is not only one of Orozco's finest creations and one of Dartmouth's most treasured works of art but also rightfully placed among the most exemplary works of mural painting in the nation.

Last Updated: 8/24/15