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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Current Exhibitions

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection, on view in the Hood's Gutman Gallery. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

Allan Houser, This Was Our Home, 1993, bronze, edition of 6. © Chiinde LLC, exhibition loan courtesy of Allan Houser, Inc. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

Allan Houser, This Was Our Home, 1993, bronze, edition of 6. © Chiinde LLC, exhibition loan courtesy of Allan Houser, Inc. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

The exhibitions presented by the museum are intended to contribute to scholarship in art history and related disciplines and to offer insight into the artistic production of many different historical periods and cultures. In addition to ongoing displays from its permanent collection, the museum also presents a number of special exhibitions each year, covering a broad range of topics, as well as teaching exhibitions. Organized in conjunction with Dartmouth College courses, these exhibitions are intended to facilitate the curricular use of the museum's collections.


PLEASE NOTE: The museum will be closed from December 20, 2014, through January 5, 2015, reopening at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, January 6, with regular hours. Due to exhibition changeover, only the Sack Gallery of American art and the Gutman Gallery of African art remain open through early January.

 

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection

Ongoing

This exhibition explores the Hood Museum of Art's extraordinary collection of African weapons for the first time. It focuses on the aesthetic quality of the objects, and on the ways in which they reflect notions of masculinity, warriorhood, and ideal male beauty in traditional African societies. Because the weapons are in a Western museum's collection, the exhibition also considers Western notions of masculinity, as represented in the collecting practices of those Christian missionaries, colonial administrators, military officers, big game hunters, and explorers who acquired most of these weapons in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. Although the exhibition draws from several cultures in the five sub-regions of Africa, it is not a broad survey of African weapons. Instead, it presents exemplary highlights from the Hood's extensive collection, categorized as "offensive" and "defensive" weapons.

This exhibition is organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously supported by the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund.

 

Allan Houser: A Centennial Exhibition

Through May 10, 2015

Allan Houser (1914–1994) was a noted American sculptor, painter, and draftsman and one of the major figures in Native American art of the twentieth century. He often drew on his Chiricahua Apache heritage in making sculptures that depicted the Native American people of the Southwest. A versatile artist, he also created modernist abstract sculptures and worked in a variety of media including bronze, stone, and steel. Dartmouth College celebrates the centennial of his birth with an installation of five major sculptural works in the Maffei Arts Plaza and Hood Museum of Art gateway.

This exhibition is organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously supported by Mary Alice Kean Raynolds and David R.W. Raynolds, Class of 1949, and the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund.

 

A Space for Dialogue: Fresh Perspectives on the Permanent Collection from Dartmouth's Students

Ongoing
At the entrance to the museum


A Space for Dialogue is a unique opportunity within Dartmouth's senior internship program, which includes museum positions in curatorial, public relations, and educational work. Interns choose objects from the Hood's permanent collection, write descriptions of the objects, design a space, create a brochure, and conduct a public gallery presentation. The program also allows students to develop art projects and displays within the Hood Museum of Art and on the Dartmouth College campus, creating "spaces for dialogue" between works of art and their viewers.

A Space for Dialogue, founded with support from the Class of 1948, is made possible with generous endowments from the Class of 1967, Bonnie and Richard Reiss Jr. '66, and Pamela J. Joyner '79.

 

José Clemente Orozco: The Epic of American Civilization

Ongoing
Orozco Room, Baker Library, Dartmouth College


The Epic of American Civilization is an extensive mural cycle created by Mexican artist José Clemente Orozco between 1932 and 1934. The mural is composed of twenty-four distinct panels depicting the history of the Americas from the Aztec migration into Mexico to the industrialization of modern society. Located in the reserve corridor of Baker Library, now the Orozco Room, these scenes cover nearly 3,200 square feet of wall space. The Epic of American Civilization is not only one of Orozco's finest creations and one of Dartmouth's most treasured works of art but also rightfully placed among the most exemplary works of mural painting in the nation.

Last Updated: 12/17/14