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And do you not remember, I said, that we also declared that we must conduct the children to war on horseback to be spectators, and wherever it may be safe, bring them to the front and give them a taste of blood as we do with whelps?
— Plato, Republic, Bk. 7, 537a


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Electra: I weave my clothes myself and slavelike at the loom
must work or else walk naked through the world in nothing.
I fetch and carry water from the riverside,
I am deprived of holy festivals and dances,
I cannot talk to women since I am a girl.
— Euripides, Electra, 306–311


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I have been handed over to a man thoroughly wicked; I am perishing from being whipped; I am tied up; I am treated like dirt—more and more!
— Letter from the slave Lesis to a man named Xenocles, taken from
D.R. Jordan, "A Personal Letter Found in the Athenian Agora,” Hesperia 69 (2000), 91–103


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Now, Nicarete—the freedwoman of Charisius of Elis and his cook—owned these seven girls from when they were small children. She was an expert in recognizing beauty in small children and understood how to rear and train them from long experience; this was her trade and she earned her living from them. When she had reaped the profit of their prime, she sold their bodies, each and every one of the seven this Naera too.
— Demosthenes, Speeches, 59.18–19


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Once I was seven I became an arrephoros (bearer of secret things). Then at ten I became a grain-grinder (aletris) for the goddess. After that, wearing a saffron robe, I was a bear (arktos) at Brauron. And, as a lovely young girl, I once served as a basket bearer (kanephoros), wearing a string of figs.
— Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 641–647


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