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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Witness

Barkley L. Hendricks (American, born 1945). Lawdy Mama, 1969. Oil and gold leaf on canvas, 53 3/4 x 36 1/4 in. (136.5 x 92.1 cm). The Studio Museum in Harlem, Gift of Stuart Liebman, in memory of Joseph B. Liebman, 83.25. © Barkley L. Hendricks. Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York Jack Whitten (American, born 1939). Birmingham 1964. Aluminum foil, newsprint, stocking, and oil on plywood, 16 5/8 x 16 in. (42.2 x 40.6 cm). Collection of the artist, courtesy of the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York. © Jack Whitten Edward Kienholz (American, 1927-1994). It Takes Two to Integrate (Cha, Cha, Cha), 1961. Painted dolls, dried fish, glass in wooden box, 31 1/4 x 22 1/2 x 7 1/2 in. (79.4 x 57.2 x 19.1 cm). Collection of David R. Packard and M. Bernadette Castor, Portola Valley, CA © Kienholz. Photo: Courtesy of L.A. Louver, Venice, California David Hammons (American, born 1943). The Door (Admissions Office), 1969. Wood, acrylic sheet, and pigment construction, 79 x 48 x 15 in. (200.7 x 122 x 38.1 cm). California African American Museum, Los Angeles, Collection of Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum. © David Hammons Overstreet The New Jemima 1964, 1970 Acrylic on fabric over plywood construction Jae Jarrell (American, born 1935). Urban Wall Suit, ca. 1969. Sewn and painted cotton and silk, two-piece suit, 37 1/2 x 27 1/2 x 1/2 in. (95.3 x 69.9 x 1.3 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of R.M. Atwater, Anna Wolfrom Dove, Alice Fiebiger, Joseph Fiebiger, Belle Campbell Harriss, and Emma L. Hyde, by exchange; Designated Purchase Fund, Mary Smith Dorward Fund, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, and Carll H. de Silver Fund, 2012.80.16. © Jae Jarrell Jeff Donaldson (American, 1932-2004). Wives of Shango, 1969. Watercolor with mixed media on paper, Sheet: 30 x 22 in. (76.2 x 55.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of R.M. Atwater, Anna Wolfrom Dove, Alice Fiebiger, Joseph Fiebiger, Belle Campbell Harriss, and Emma L. Hyde, by exchange; Designated Purchase Fund, Mary Smith Dorward Fund, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, and Carll H. de Silver Fund, 2012.80.13. © Jameela K. Donaldson Benny Andrews, Witness, 1968, oil on canvas with painted fabric collage. © Estate of Benny Andrews / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photo by Joshua Nefsky; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY Jacob Lawrence, Soldiers and Students, 1962, opaque watercolor over graphite on wove paper. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Bequest of Jay R. Wolf, Class of 1951; W.976.187. © 2014 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties

August 30 through December 14, 2014

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties offers a focused look at painting, sculpture, graphics, and photography from a decade defined by social protest and American race relations. In observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this exhibition considers how sixty-six of the decade's artists, including African Americans and some of their white, Latino, Asian American, Native American, and Caribbean contemporaries, used wide-ranging aesthetic approaches to address the struggle for racial justice.

This exhibition is curated by Teresa A. Carbone, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of American Art, Brooklyn Museum, and Kellie Jones, Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University.

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and made possible by the Ford Foundation.

The exhibition's presentation at the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, was generously supported by Claire Foerster and Daniel S. Bernstein, Class of 1987, Kate and Yaz Krehbiel, Class of 1991, Thayer 1992, and the Leon C. 1927, Charles L. 1955, and Andrew J. 1984 Greenebaum Fund.

Press release

Press Coverage: The Dartmouth -- Dartmouth Now -- Boston Globe -- Valley News

Exhibition Audio Guide

In partnership with GUIDEPLE, the Hood Museum of Art has created a supplemental audio guide for Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties.

The audio guide offers descriptions of select events, people, and groups that were pivotal in moving the civil rights movement forward and served as inspiration to some of the artists in this exhibition. The guide also highlights events that took place here at Dartmouth College.

How to download the audio guide application for your smartphone (PDF)

Audio guide text (PDF)

Video

On October 30, at 4:30 p.m., Julian Bond, a key figure in the civil rights movement who continues to deliver a powerful message of equality, freedom, and justice today, will visit Dartmouth. Watch J. Bruce Nelson, Professor Emeritus of History, and Olivia Field '15, Public Relations Katherine Conroy Intern, discuss Julian Bond's life, career, accomplishments, and eventful previous visit to Dartmouth in 1986. The Julian Bond event on October 30 is presented in conjunction with Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties and is co-sponsored by the Hood Museum of Art and the Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity.

 

Related Events

22 September, Monday, 6:00–7:00 p.m.
Rauner Library Reading Room
SPECIAL PROGRAM
From the Archives: Civil Rights at Dartmouth
Join Morgan Swan, Special Collections Education and Outreach Librarian at Rauner Library, to explore Dartmouth's special collections materials related to the civil rights movement. Attendance is limited to 20 people. Please email mogan.r.swan@dartmouth.edu to reserve your spot! This program is offered in conjunction with Rauner Library's September exhibit highlighting documents and photographs connecting Dartmouth to the civil rights movement.

 

27 September, Saturday, 2:00 p.m.
INTRODUCTORY TOUR
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties

 

14 October, Tuesday, 12:30 p.m.
Second-floor galleries
LUNCHTIME GALLERY TALK
"Black Power's Global Vision: Decolonization Movements in Latin America and the Caribbean"
Reena N. Goldthree, Assistant Professor, African and African American Studies, Dartmouth College

 

15 October, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Hood Museum of Art Auditorium
ARTIST TALK
Activist artists Jae Jarrell and Wadsworth Jarrell, founding members of the Chicago collective AfriCOBRA, formed in 1968, will share its philosophy and their art in this special program facilitated by Rebecca Zorach, Professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago. Two works by Jae Jarrell appear in Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties. A reception will follow in Kim Gallery.

 

16 October, Thursday, 7:00 p.m.
Second-floor galleries
SPECIAL PERFORMANCE
Reading of A Raisin in the Sun
The Hood Museum of Art and Northern Stage partner to present a live dramatic reading of Lorraine Hansberry's 1959 play A Raisin in the Sun, revived this year on Broadway. Professional and Dartmouth student actors will read the play—which chronicles a few weeks in the life of an African American family in Chicago in the 1950s—within the exhibition galleries for Witness. Join us for light refreshments and an introduction to the exhibition at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 8 p.m. Seating is limited within the exhibition galleries; a live feed will allow for overflow in the Hood Auditorium. No tickets required.

 

18 October, Saturday, 2:00 p.m.
SPECIAL TOUR
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties
Juliette Bianco, Deputy Director, and Jessica Womack, Curatorial Assistant

 

22 October, Wednesday, 6:30–8:30 p.m.
ADULT WORKSHOP
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties
In this discussion-based workshop, we will consider how artists in Witness responded to the political, social, and cultural events of the sixties. In the studio, we will use a variety of materials to explore further the theme of activism in our own lives. No previous art experience necessary. Enrollment is limited. Registration information coming soon.

 

24 and 25 October, Friday and Saturday
EXHIBITION CELEBRATION EVENTS
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties
Join us for a focus on the Hood's presentation of this groundbreaking exhibition of more than one hundred works of art that span a decade defined by social protest and American race relations.

24 October, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Hood Museum of Art Auditorium
LECTURE
"Civil / Rights / Act: Art and Activism in the 1960s"
Kellie Jones, Associate Professor in Art History and Archaeology and the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University and co-curator of Witness, will offer a look at how artists engage in changing the world in which we live, in ways both subtle and overt.
PUBLIC RECEPTION
The lecture will be followed by a reception with live music in the Kim Gallery from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

25 October, Saturday, 2:00 p.m.
Second-floor galleries
SPECIAL TOUR
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties
Teresa A. Carbone, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of American Art, Brooklyn Museum, and co-curator of Witness, will lead a tour exploring both the works on view and the forming of the exhibition.

 

29 October, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.
Hood Museum of Art Auditorium
LECTURE
"'To the Spirit!': The Art of William Christopher and the Civil Rights Movement"
Craig Steven Wilder, Professor and Head of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Diana L. Linden, art historian / independent scholar, will share their recent research on artist and civil rights activist William Christopher (1924–1973), who taught at Dartmouth and drew inspiration from Martin Luther King Jr., joining the March in Selma at King's invitation.

 

30 October, Thursday, 4:30–6:00 p.m.
Hood Museum of Art Auditorium
SPECIAL EVENT
A Discussion with Julian Bond
Beginning with his pivotal role in the civil rights movement, Julian Bond has always been a leader on the front lines of social change. Legendary as the first black U.S. vice-presidential nominee and former chairman of the NAACP, Bond continues to deliver a powerful message of equality, freedom, and justice with a renewed sense of relevance. His talk will be followed by a Q&A. Live-fed overflow seating will be available in Dartmouth 105. This program is offered in conjunction with the exhibition Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties. Co-sponsored by the Hood Museum of Art and the Office of Institutional Diversity & Equity.

 

4 November, Tuesday, 12:30 p.m.
LUNCHTIME GALLERY TALK
Bennie Niles '15 and Yomalis Rosario '15 are two of three Dartmouth seniors awarded fellowships to pursue a year-long research project instead of taking classes. Join them for a special tour of Witness, as they explore how their research projects connect with the themes of the exhibition. Niles's work focuses on Malcolm X and ideas of black masculinity, and Rosario's on the struggle for citizenship for Haitian-Dominicans through photography and oral history.

 

11 November, Tuesday, 12:30 p.m.
LUNCHTIME GALLERY TALK
"Black/Rights/Concrete/Abstract"
J. Martin Favor, Associate Professor of English, Dartmouth College

 

13 December, Saturday, 2:00 p.m.
INTRODUCTORY TOUR
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties

Last Updated: 10/22/14