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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Current School Tours

The Hood Museum of Art welcomes school groups to explore the world of art!

Tours of our permanent collection and changing exhibitions are available to school groups and the public, free of charge. Museum staff members develop tours with the goals of introducing students to a museum experience, actively engaging them with original works of art, and improving their visual literacy.

The schedule of school tours is updated on this page each season during the school year. If you would like to receive information about our tours and other programs directly via our mailings and email announcements, please contact the Education Department at hood.museum.tours@dartmouth.edu.

Learn more about our exhibitions.

 

Auto-Graphics: Works by Victor Ekpuk

April 28–August 2, 2015

Nigerian-born artist Victor Ekpuk is best known for his improvisational use of nsibidi, a form of writing with symbols associated with the powerful Ekpe men's association of southeastern Nigeria. His fascination with nsibidi during his years as an undergraduate student in Nigeria led to his broader explorations of drawing as writing, and to the invention of his own fluid letterforms.

On this tour, students will explore Ekpuk’s artistic process and his invention of a graphic language made up of symbols that are inspired by nsibidi, and will also have the opportunity to compare and contrast traditional nsibidi forms on ukara cloth with Ekpuk’s contemporary and personal expression.

 

This tour is recommended for all grade levels.

Related Teacher Resources

 

Tours of the exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:

  • analyze and interpret exemplary works of art from Africa
  • explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, worldviews, and value systems, as well as their intellectual and artistic expression
  • increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
  • explore materials and processes in art-making

Ukara: Ritual Cloth of the Ekpe Secret Society

April 28–August 2, 2015

This exhibition examines the ukara cloth of the Ekpe secret society, a multiethnic all-male association in southeastern Nigeria and southwestern Cameroon. It explores the longstanding cultural practice the cloth represents and the artistic process involved in its creation. The cloth is made of plain cotton that is transformed into a ritual object when nsibidi is inscribed onto it through indigo dyeing. Nsibidi is a body of ideographic symbols used by the Ekpe Society as a form of coded communication.

 

Through interactive activities and dialogue-based conversations, students will learn about the multiple ways that ukara functions as well as the process involved in making ukara.

 

This tour is recommended for all grade levels.

Related Teacher Resources

 

Tours of the exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:

  • analyze and interpret exemplary works of art from Africa
  • explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, worldviews, and value systems, as well as their intellectual and artistic expression
  • increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
  • explore materials and processes in art-making

 

About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art

On View January 31–August 30, 2015

On this tour, students will explore the portraiture and self-portraiture in our American and European galleries and in the exhibition About Face: Self-Portraiture in Contemporary Art. Through this exploration, students will consider how contemporary artists respond to and reflect on identity, specifically self-identity and how one presents oneself to the world around her/him. The tour will invite students to compare and contrast how artists from past generations and how contemporary artists explore the theme of identity. Students will be invited to think critically about how we construct and present ourselves to the world and the ways in which the self is valued and fashioned both today and in the past.

 Organized in collaboration with nine Dartmouth College students, this exhibition explores the extraordinary range and global diversity of self-portraiture in contemporary art. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, prints, and video by seventeen noted contemporary artists – Chuck Close, Susanna Coffey, Félix de la Concha, Rineke Dijkstra, Marit Fөlstad, Martín Gutierrez, Nikki S. Lee, Sarah McEneaney, Bruce Nauman, Wendy Red Star, Enrico Riley, Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, Renée Stout, Christian Thompson, Jeff Wall, and Francesca Woodman.

 

This tour is recommended for students in middle and high school and above.

Related Teacher Resources 

Tours of this exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by providing students opportunities to:

  • increase their skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts
  • identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design
  • demonstrate understanding of  historical eras, styles, and evolving technologies that have helped define forms and structures in the arts

Water Ways: Tension and Flow

April 20–August 23, 2015

Water Ways: Tension and Flow explores the intersection of water and the environment, particularly environmental issues surrounding droughts and floods as a result of our changing climate. It also examines ways in which water plays an important role for the mind, body, and spirit. Water is ubiquitous in our lives—we use it for drinking, cooking and cleaning, and recreation. The exhibition delves into water’s impact on human life and humanity’s impact on water and the environment on a global scale. 

While this exhibition includes two dozen works in a range of media (textile, carved relief, ceramic pot, painting, and video projection), the majority are contemporary photographs by international artists, many of which document the effects of industrialization and climate change on the environment. This exhibition is organized in conjunction with the Hopkins Center’s presentation of The Nile Project. (https://hop.dartmouth.edu/Online/the_nile_project)

On this tour, students can investigate and learn more about water and its impact on people around the world, as well as the human impact on this natural resource. Connections will be made between our local Connecticut and Mascoma river systems and other communities who live on or near rivers. Issues of sustainability and human use and impact on water resources will also be explored.

This tour is recommended for all grade levels.

 

Tours of the exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:

  • explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, worldviews, and value systems, as well as their intellectual and artistic expression related to the environment
  • increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
  • describe the impact of certain environmental changes, including deforestation, invasive species, increased erosion, and pollution-containing toxic substances could have on local environments

 

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection

Through December 20, 2014

This exhibition features seventy offensive and defensive weapons from over forty culture groups throughout the continent of Africa. The objects are incredibly beautiful works of art but also teach us about the art of blacksmithing, rites of passage, ceremony, and concepts of male beauty from specific countries and culture groups throughout Africa.

Tours will feature a range of activities, such as looking exercises, group discussions, sketching, writing, and hands-on materials, to help students build skills for understanding and learning about African art. The objects offer insights about different cultures and people and will connect with studies around world cultures, history, geography, material objects, art, art history, and more.

This tour is recommended for all grade levels.

Tours of the exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:
- analyze and interpret exemplary works of art from Africa
- explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, world views, and value systems, and their intellectual and artistic expression
- increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
- increase understanding of artistic process
- explore materials and processes in art-making

Related Teacher Resources

Introduction to the Museum--Highlights

In this tour, students will look at and discuss a range of works that span different countries, time periods, and media. It provides a wonderful introduction to museums and the art in the Hood's collections and can be shaped to respond to the interests of your students. Teachers can discuss options when they call to schedule the tour.

This tour is recommended for students of all ages.

 

The Assyrian Reliefs

Originally part of the decorative scheme of the Northwest Palace of King Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BCE) in what is now known as Nimrud, Iraq, the six large-scale reliefs depict a ritual performance undertaken by the king. Human and supernatural beings are also in attendance. Through these works of art, students can learn about history, religion, politics, and cuneiform (the earliest form of writing).

This tour is recommended for students of all ages.

 

The Orozco Mural

Located in Baker-Berry Library

José Clemente Orozco, one of the three most famous Mexican muralists, came to Dartmouth in the early 1930s and painted the fresco cycle The Epic of American Civilization in Baker Library. In this mural, Orozco depicted his interpretation of the history of the Americas, from ancient Aztec culture through the arrival of Cortéz and into the early twentieth century. Tours of this dynamic work addresses issues of class, cultural conflict, education, religion, and power.

This tour is recommended for students in grades six and above.

Related Teacher Resources

Learn more about the Orozco mural

Last Updated: 4/24/15