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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Current School Tours

The Hood Museum of Art welcomes school groups to explore the world of art!

Tours of our permanent collection and changing exhibitions are available to school groups and the public, free of charge. Museum staff members develop tours with the goals of introducing students to a museum experience, actively engaging them with original works of art, and improving their visual literacy.

The schedule of school tours is updated on this page each season during the school year. If you would like to receive information about our tours and other programs directly via our mailings and email announcements, please contact the Education Department at hood.museum.tours@dartmouth.edu.

Learn more about our exhibitions.

 

Canaletto’s Vedute Prints: An Exhibition in Honor of Adolph Weil Jr.

September 10–December 6, 2015

On this tour, students will travel to 18th century Italy to explore thirty etchings by the Venetian artist, Canaletto.  Although Canaletto is best known for his paintings of scenes in Venice, Canaletto’s Vedute Prints: An Exhibition in Honor of Adolph Weil Jr. celebrates Canaletto’s etchings of places (real and imagined) in Italy.  This tour will explore the process of printmaking and mark making, the daily lives and activities of people in the 18th century, and the impact that these prints had on the people who lived during that time period. Students will have the opportunity to look carefully and analyze these works, sketch and find details and make connections to the way we travel and experience new places in the 21st century.

This tour is recommended for students of all ages.

Related Teacher Resources 

Related Teacher Workshop

This tour supports the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:

-  analyze and interpret exemplary works of art from Africa
-  explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, world views, and value systems, and their intellectual and artistic expression
-  increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
-  increase understanding of artistic process
-  explore materials and processes in art-making

The tour also supports the following National Core Visual Arts Standards:

- Creating

Anchor Standard 1: Essential Question(s): What conditions, attitudes, and behaviors support creativity and innovative thinking? What factors prevent or encourage people to take creative risks? How does collaboration expand the creative process?

- Presenting

Anchor Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
 Enduring Understanding: Artists and other presenters consider various techniques, methods, venues, and criteria when analyzing, selecting, and curating objects artifacts, and artworks for preservation and presentation.

 Essential Question(s): How are artworks cared for and by whom? What criteria, methods, and processes are used to select work for preservation or presentation? Why do people value objects, artifacts, and artworks, and select them for presentation?

- Responding

Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work Enduring Understanding: Individual aesthetic and empathetic awareness developed through engagement with art can lead to understanding and appreciation of self, others, the natural world, and constructed environments.

Essential Question(s): How do life experiences influence the way you relate to art? How does learning about art impact how we perceive the world? What can we learn from our responses to art?

Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.

People, Places and Environments

October 27, 2015-March 13, 2016

On this tour, students will explore painting, sculpture, and prints from Europe, America, and the Arctic to discover what individual cultures value about the land; for example, the need to tame the wilderness, the urge to harness environmental resources, or the importance of living in harmony with the natural world. As a pre-visit activity, classes are encouraged to explore examples of contemporary environmental photography on the museum’s website to consider how art reflects twenty-first century concerns with climate change, pollution, overpopulation, and sustainability. As a post-visit activity, classes are encouraged to photograph their own environment and analyze the images using the tools they have learned to examine and interpret visual material.

This tour is recommended for all ages.

Related Teacher Resources

This tour supports:

National Social Studies Standard 3: Peoples, Places, and Environments

National Geography Standard 6: How culture and experience influence people's perceptions of places and regions

Collecting and Sharing

October 6-December 6, 2015

Why do collectors choose one type of object over another? How do these objects find their way into museum collections? On this tour, students will glimpse what goes on “behind the scenes” at the museum. Using real archaeological tools and conservation photographs, they will examine objects that were once dug out of the ground, transported by camel, and finally restored in the museum’s galleries. They will be invited to travel to faraway lands to collect objects that may challenge their ways of viewing the world. With a connoisseur’s eye, they will be asked to consider the marks and surfaces of works of art to assess aesthetic quality or analyze an individual object to determine whether it was created by one artist or the product of multiple “hands”.  Along the way, they will learn many of the fascinating stories behind the objects on view and the important role of collectors and museums in preserving and presenting our cultural heritage.

This tour is recommended for all ages.

This tour supports:

National Core Visual Arts Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.

Essential Question(s): How are artworks cared for and by whom? What criteria, methods, and processes are used to select work for preservation or presentation? Why do people value objects, artifacts, and artworks, and select them for presentation?

 

Art from the Arctic

Through December 6, 2015

The twentieth century brought great changes to Inuit peoples of the Canadian Arctic. Many moved from a semi-migratory life on the land into settlements, where they began to produce works of art—in stone, fabric, and on paper—oriented for a non-Inuit art market.   The production of this work created a vehicle for preserving cultural knowledge and sustaining tradition while innovating and creating new forms of expression. Tradition and Transformation: Twentieth Century Inuit Art from the Collection of the Hood Museum of Art features sculpture, tools, clothing, and prints from this period of transition. Through detail cards, sketching activities, and contextual photographs, students will discover the relationship between old and new art forms and the ways in which indigenous peoples survive and thrive in the unique climate and conditions of the far north.

This tour is recommended for all ages.

Related Teacher Resources

Related Teacher Workshop

This tour supports:

National Core Visual Arts Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding

Essential Question(s): How does art help us understand the lives of people of different times, places, and cultures? How is art used to impact the views of a society? How does art preserve aspects of life?

National Geography Standard 6: How culture and experience influence people's perceptions of places and regions

National Geography Standard 11: The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth's surface

National Social Studies Standard 3: Peoples, Places, and Environments

 

Water Ways: Tension and Flow

April 20–August 23, 2015

Water Ways: Tension and Flow explores the intersection of water and the environment, particularly environmental issues surrounding droughts and floods as a result of our changing climate. It also examines ways in which water plays an important role for the mind, body, and spirit. Water is ubiquitous in our lives—we use it for drinking, cooking and cleaning, and recreation. The exhibition delves into water’s impact on human life and humanity’s impact on water and the environment on a global scale. 

While this exhibition includes two dozen works in a range of media (textile, carved relief, ceramic pot, painting, and video projection), the majority are contemporary photographs by international artists, many of which document the effects of industrialization and climate change on the environment. This exhibition is organized in conjunction with the Hopkins Center’s presentation of The Nile Project. (https://hop.dartmouth.edu/Online/the_nile_project)

On this tour, students can investigate and learn more about water and its impact on people around the world, as well as the human impact on this natural resource. Connections will be made between our local Connecticut and Mascoma river systems and other communities who live on or near rivers. Issues of sustainability and human use and impact on water resources will also be explored.

This tour is recommended for all grade levels.

 

Tours of the exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:

  • explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, worldviews, and value systems, as well as their intellectual and artistic expression related to the environment
  • increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
  • describe the impact of certain environmental changes, including deforestation, invasive species, increased erosion, and pollution-containing toxic substances could have on local environments

 

The Art of Weapons: Selections from the African Collection

Through December 6, 2015

This exhibition features seventy offensive and defensive weapons from over forty culture groups throughout the continent of Africa. The objects are incredibly beautiful works of art but also teach us about the art of blacksmithing, rites of passage, ceremony, and concepts of male beauty from specific countries and culture groups throughout Africa.

Tours will feature a range of activities, such as looking exercises, group discussions, sketching, writing, and hands-on materials, to help students build skills for understanding and learning about African art. The objects offer insights about different cultures and people and will connect with studies around world cultures, history, geography, material objects, art, art history, and more.

This tour is recommended for all grade levels.

Tours of the exhibition support the NH Frameworks and VT Standards by helping students to:
- analyze and interpret exemplary works of art from Africa
- explore primary sources to learn about concepts of culture, human diversity, world views, and value systems, and their intellectual and artistic expression
- increase skills for analyzing and evaluating the visual arts in relation to history and culture
- increase understanding of artistic process
- explore materials and processes in art-making

Related Teacher Resources

Introduction to the Museum--Highlights

In this tour, students will look at and discuss a range of works that span different countries, time periods, and media. It provides a wonderful introduction to museums and the art in the Hood's collections and can be shaped to respond to the interests of your students. Teachers can discuss options when they call to schedule the tour.

This tour is recommended for students of all ages.

 

The Assyrian Reliefs

Originally part of the decorative scheme of the Northwest Palace of King Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BCE) in what is now known as Nimrud, Iraq, the six large-scale reliefs depict a ritual performance undertaken by the king. Human and supernatural beings are also in attendance. Through these works of art, students can learn about history, religion, politics, and cuneiform (the earliest form of writing).

This tour is recommended for students of all ages.

 

The Orozco Mural

Located in Baker-Berry Library

José Clemente Orozco, one of the three most famous Mexican muralists, came to Dartmouth in the early 1930s and painted the fresco cycle The Epic of American Civilization in Baker Library. In this mural, Orozco depicted his interpretation of the history of the Americas, from ancient Aztec culture through the arrival of Cortéz and into the early twentieth century. Tours of this dynamic work addresses issues of class, cultural conflict, education, religion, and power.

This tour is recommended for students in grades six and above.

Related Teacher Resources

Learn more about the Orozco mural

Last Updated: 8/14/15