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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Collections Overview

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The permanent collection spaces at the Hood Museum of Art: Sack, Gutman, Kim, and Albright Galleries.

Comprising nearly 65,000 works of art and artifacts from a broad range of cultures and historical periods, the permanent collection of the Hood Museum of Art represents a remarkable cultural and educational asset for both Dartmouth College and the communities of the Upper Valley region of Vermont and New Hampshire. The nearly thirty thousand objects that originally constituted the College's ethnographic collection are among the museum's most important holdings, in which Native American, African, and Melanesian art are well represented. Since 1985 these collections have grown, mainly through acquisitions of African art, a significant gift of over one thousand works of Melanesian art from the Harry A. Franklin Family Collection, purchases of Native American ledger drawings, and gifts of alumni. Among the most important works in the museum's collection are the six Assyrian stone reliefs from the palace of Ashurnasirpal that date from around 900 BCE. The collection is equally strong in works representing the diverse artistic traditions of Europe, the United States, and Asia. Particularly noteworthy are the museum's collection of American portraits and landscape paintings and its holdings of American and European prints, drawings, and watercolors, which today number nearly twenty thousand sheets.

In addition, the museum oversees the remarkable fresco mural cycle by Jose Clemente Orozco, The Epic of American Civilization, which he painted in Baker Library from 1932 to 1934. Contemporary art (post-1945) is represented as well with works from the United States, Africa, Europe, and South America.

Last Updated: 10/5/12