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The Collections

Archive of Photographer James Nachtwey ’70 Acquired by Hood Museum

by Dartmouth's Office of Communications

The more than 500,000 images document conditions in the world’s most dangerous places.

The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth has acquired the complete archive of award-winning photojournalist and war photographer James Nachtwey ’70, who has spent more than 35 years documenting conditions in some of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

Dartmouth Acquires Complete Archive of Acclaimed Photojournalist James Nachtwey

Alumni Voices: James Nachtwey, Class of 1970

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2016

Senior Curator of Collections and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming Katherine Hart sent James Nachtwey a series of questions upon the completion of the museum’s acquisition of his life’s work. Here are his replies.

Recent Acquisitions: Alma Woodsey Thomas, Wind Dancing with Spring Flowers, 1969

Recent Acquisitions: Lyman, Fenton & Co. / United States Pottery Co., Pair of Lions, about 1849–58

Where Will the Art Go?

Plan a road trip to see works from the Hood’s permanent collection.*

The Life and Legacy of Ota Benga

A Special Installation and Panel Discussion

Ota Benga (about 1883–1916) was a grossly mistreated and mostly neglected figure in the history of our country. He was taken prisoner in the Congo and transferred to the United States for display in the 1904 World’s Fair and then sent to live in the Bronx Zoo with the apes; he eventually committed suicide in 1916.

Featured Collection: Public Art on Campus

Dartmouth College has a distinguished collection of works of public art throughout its campus. Ellsworth Kelly’s stunning Dartmouth Panels (2012)—a major site-specific work consisting of five monochromatic aluminum panels, each painted in a single block of radiant color—were designed for the east façade of the Hopkins Center’s Spaulding Auditorium, facing the Black Family Visual Arts Center.

Featured Collection: Scientific Instruments

The Dartmouth Collection of Scientific Instruments dates from the founding of the College in 1769. It mirrors the development of American science in an academic setting, from the early days of the Republic through the Cold War.

José Clemente Orozco: The Epic of American Civilization

The Epic of American Civilization is an extensive mural cycle created by Mexican artist José Clemente Orozco between 1932 and 1934. One of Orozco’s finest creations and one of Dartmouth’s most treasured works, it was designated a national historic landmark in 2013.

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