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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Recent Acquisitions 8

Unknown, American; possibly Ethan Allen Greenwood, American, 1779-1856
Portrait of Man, about 1815
Oil on panel
28 x 23 in.; Frame: 33 x 28 1/2 in.
Gift of Carol Magenau; 2008.80.1

Unknown, American; possibly Ethan Allen Greenwood, American, 1779-1856
Portrait of a Woman, about 1815
Oil on canvas
28 x 24 in.; Frame: 33 x 29 1/4 in.
Gift of Carol Magenau; 2008.80.2

Stylistically, these two portraits strongly resemble works painted by itinerant painter Ethan Allen Greenwood, Dartmouth Class of 1806. Greenwood began painting portraits shortly before he enrolled at the college in 1802 and pursued this trade for the rest of his career. At various points, however, he also taught school, studied the law, kept a shop, and operated museums. Although primarily self-taught, Greenwood benefited from brief training in 1806 from New York painter Edward Savage. After Greenwood moved from his native Hubbardston, Massachusetts, to Boston in 1812, he received inspiration and at least one informal critique from “the great Stuartt” (Gilbert Stuart), the nation’s leading portraitist.

These portraits likely date from after 1812 when, likely under Stuart’s influence, Greenwood adopted a more sophisticated style and began to incorporate into his compositions such neoclassical elements as columns, red drapery, and glimpses of blue skies to one side. The fact that he painted the male portrait on a wooden panel and the female portrait on canvas suggests that he rendered them at different times. It seems probable that they depict members of the Woodward family because a previous owner acquired them along with that family’s papers. They were long believed to represent the College’s first librarian, Bezaleel Woodward (1745-1804) and his wife, Mary Wheelock Woodward (1748-1807). If, however, these works were painted by Greenwood in the mid-teens, as several art historians concur, the previously deceased Woodwards are almost certainly not the subjects. These paintings join two other portraits by Greenwood in the museum’s collection.

 

Hannes Beckmann, American, 1909-1977
Monument, 1972
Oil on canvas
44 1/4 x 48 1/4 in.
Gift of Ann Boeckler in memory of Erich Boeckler; 2008.81.1

Hannes Beckmann, American, 1909-1977
Blue Diamond, 1972
Acrylic on Masonite
42 x 42 in.
Gift of Ann Boeckler in memory of Erich Boeckler; 2008.81.2

 

Unknown artist, Minnesota, Eastern Sioux
Vest, about 1885
Native tanned hide, cotton fabric, porcupine quills, silk ribbons, glass beads, dye
19 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (mounted); mounted depth: 8 1/2 in.
Gift of Stephen A. Lister, Class of 1963; 2008.82

Stephen A. Lister of Santa Fe, New Mexico, Dartmouth Class of 1963, and a member of the Hood Museum of Art Board of Overseers, has recently donated an Eastern Sioux (Dakota) vest. Dating to about 1885 and made of tanned hide and cotton fabric, it is decorated with dyed porcupine quills and glass beads in an abstract floral pattern. According to Joe Horse Capture, guest co-curator of the Hood’s upcoming exhibition of its Native American collection in 2010-11, the Dakota tribe straddles two cultural regions, the Great Lakes/Woodlands and the Plains. This vest, probably made from deer hide, is a good example of late nineteenth-century work. The Great Lakes/Woodlands influence can be seen in the repeating floral designs shown on the front of the vest. The quilled line that travels around the edge toward the back has branchlike forms on which there is small, leaf-like imagery. The Plains elements of this vest are the five-pointed stars and the color of the quills. The Hood is most warmly appreciative to Mr. Lister, a collector of both Indonesian textiles (shown at the Hood in spring and summer 2009) and Native American art, for his ongoing support.

 

2008.83.1-50 Gift of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. This acquisition is being processed, and will be fully documented in the 2009-10 Annual Report.

 

Robert Samuel Marcuard, English, 1756-before 1788, after Joshua Reynolds, British, 1723-1792
Francesco Bartolozzi, 1788
Etching and stipple in colors (partly reworked with watercolors) on laid paper
Sheet: 13 3/8 x 10 13/16 in.; mount sheet: 16 3/8 x 20 7/16 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.1

Francesco Bartolozzi popularized stipple printmaking, a technique produced by working through an etching ground with a roulette (a metal wheel covered with sharp points), and—after biting—followed by a graver or burin applied directly on the plate to obtain short strokes. The soft appearance appeared closer to the effect of a drawing compared to traditional intaglio methods.

Stipple plates were easier to print in colors compared to other techniques. This was usually done à la poupée, by dabbing the colors on to the plate. This was a lengthy process requiring great skill, and color-printed impressions were usually double the price of monochrome ones. Their richness of color made such stipples greatly superior to those colored by hand, although a certain amount of touchup was often used in finishing them.

Bartolozzi worked for a while in Rome but settled in England in 1764 under the patronage of George III (1738-1820), becoming head of a school of stipple engravers—including Robert Marcuard. Bartolozzi was one of the founders of the Royal Academy, established in 1768, and had his portrait painted by his close friend, Sir Joshua Reynolds in about 1771-73. The print, however, differed in several respects compared to the original picture, which was rectangular in shape and depicted the sitter without a drawing tool in his hand. The addition of the pencil-like instrument and use of the stipple medium transformed the portrait into a veneration of the printmaker’s teacher.

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Title page from Elements of Drawing, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 14 5/8 x 19 5/16 in.; mount: 20 1/4 x 29 5/16 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.2

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Untitled (Two Women in Profile), from Elements of Drawings, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 14 11 16 x 19 5/16 in.; mount: 20 3/8 x 29 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.3

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Untitled (Study of Legs and Feet), from Elements of Drawings, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 14 5/8 x 19 7/16 in.; mount: 20 1/4 x 29 1/4 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.4

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Untitled (Study of Arms and Hands), from Elements of Drawings, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 14 1/2 x 19 5/8 in.; mount: 20 1/2 x 29 3/8 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.5

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Untitled (Woman Drawing), from Elements of Drawings, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 14 11/16 x 19 3/8 in.; mount: 20 1/8 x 29 1/8 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.6

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Untitled (Madonna di San Sisto), from Elements of Drawings, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 14 3/4 x 19 1/2 in.; mount: 20 1/2 x 29 1/4 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.7

Francesco Bartolozzi, Italian, about 1727-1815, after Francisco Vieira II, Portuguese, 1765-1805
Untitled (Seated Man), from Elements of Drawings, 1799
Etching and stipple engraving
Sheet: 19 3/8 x 14 5/8 in.; mount: 29 1/4 x 20 1/4 in.
Purchased through the Jean and Adolph Weil Jr. 1935 Fund; 2008.84.8

Last Updated: 12/21/09