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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Recent Acquisitions 5

Dwayne Wilcox, American, Oglala, born 1957
All That Communicating and No Talking, 2008
Crayon, colored pencil, and felt-tipped pen on ledger paper
11 1/2 x 17 3/4 in.
Purchased through the Guernsey Center Moore 1904 Fund; 2008.59.6

Dwayne Wilcox, American, Oglala, born 1957
Best Two Outa Three, 2008
Crayon, graphite, colored pencil, and felt-tipped pen on ledger paper
11 7/16 x 17 3/4 in.
Purchased through the Guernsey Center Moore 1904 Fund; 2008.59.7

Dwayne Wilcox, American, Oglala, born 1957
Three to Get Ready, 2006
Crayon, colored pencil, and felt-tipped pen on ledger paper
17 11/16 x 11 in.
Purchased through the Guernsey Center Moore 1904 Fund; 2008.59.8

Dwayne Wilcox, American, Oglala, born 1957
Beat Goes On, 2006
Crayon, colored pencil, and felt-tipped pen on ledger paper
17 11/16 x 11 3/8 in.
Purchased through the Guernsey Center Moore 1904 Fund; 2008.59.9

 

Terrance Guardipee, American, Blackfoot, born 1968
Mountain Chief, Blackfoot War Leader, August 2008
Mixed media collage with colored pencil, felt-tipped pen, and Hi-Liter
Sight: 18 x 26 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey ’58 Fund; 2008.60

 

Darryl Growing Thunder, American, Sioux, Assinboine, 20th century
Dancing at Poplar River, 2008
Colored pencil and ink on eight ledger pages
20 3/8 x 30 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Robert Strasenburgh II 1942 Fund; 2008.61

 

Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Japanese, 1798-1861
Gama Sennin, the Toad Spirit, Teaching Yoshikado and His Sister Takiyasha the Arts of Magic, 1845
Triptych, color woodcut
Each sheet: 14 5/16 x 9 7/8 in.; triptych overall: 14 5/16 x 29 3/8 in.
Purchased through the Julia L. Whittier Fund; 2008.62

 

W. Eugene Smith, American, 1918-1978
Nurse Midwife, 1951
Gelatin silver print
9 1/4 x 13 3/8 in.
Purchased through a gift from Andrew E. Lewin, Class of 1981; 2008.63

 

Margaret Bourke-White, American, 1904-1971
Talmud Class, 1938
Gelatin silver print
9 3/4 x 13 1/8 in.; mount: 13 7/8 x 17 1/8 in.
Purchased through the William S. Rubin Fund; 2008.64.1

Margaret Bourke-White took this photograph while commissioned by Life Magazine in the spring of 1938 to cover the developing turmoil in Czechoslovakia, following Nazi Germany’s unification of Austria into Greater Germany. It is set in Mukachevo, in Subcarpathian Ruthenia, at the first Hebrew elementary school to be established in Czechoslovakia, less than a year before the region was forced by Germany and Italy to be reclaimed by Hungary in November 1938. Mukachevo was one of the largest Jewish centers of the region, with nearly half of the population identifying itself as Jewish. Throughout the course of her five-month travels, Bourke-White witnessed not only the anti-Semitism of Nazis in the region, but also the avowal of Nazi officers that Germany would retake and cleanse Czechoslovakia, as it rightfully belonged to the German people. In this work, Bourke-White captures the humanity and innocence of these young scholars in the classroom, as some fidget and sleep while others contort their faces in concentration. Her sympathy for her subjects was no doubt compounded by the fact that Bourke-White herself was Jewish (on her father’s side), a fact that she concealed throughout this journey.

Timothy H. O’Sullivan, American, 1840-1882
Field Where Gen. Reynolds Fell, Gettysburg, negative July 1863; print 1865
Albumen print
Image: 6 15/16 x 8 7/8 in.; sheet: 12 1/4 x 15 3/4 in.
Purchased through the William S. Rubin Fund; 2008.64.2

The images captured by Timothy O’Sullivan as part of Alexander Gardner’s photography team in the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg effectively shaped the nation’s memory and perception of the Civil War. In Field Where Gen. Reynolds Fell, the half dozen bodies, robbed of their boots, stand in for the battle’s 50,000 casualties. Taken a few days after the battle, the corpses are bloated and stiff, their backs arched in agony, viscerally relating the suffering of a nation torn in two. Gardner’s team was the first to arrive following the Battle of Gettysburg and the only photographers present before the casualties were buried. They produced some of the earliest images of the human cost of war and established one of the basic visual formulas of battlefield photography that persists to the present: contorted corpses strewn across a field taken from a respectful distance. Since Union General John Fulton Reynolds did not fall in a field but rather at the eastern edge of McPherson’s Wood, it is likely that this and other images were later relabeled as key scenes and heroes—such as General Reynolds—began to pique national interest.

 

Robert Rauschenberg, American, 1925-2008
Untitled, from The Paris Review Print Series, 1965
Color offset lithograph
25 1/8 x 21 1/16 in.
Purchased through the William S. Rubin Fund; 2008.65.1

Robert Rauschenberg, American, 1925-2008
Untitled, 1984
Color screenprint
25 3/4 x 23 1/16 in. (irreg.)
Purchased through the William S. Rubin Fund; 2008.65.2

 

Unknown artist, Oklahoma; Osage
Cradle Board, early 20th century
Wood, wool fabric and yarn, paint, brass bells and studs, glass beads, hide, string
24 1/8 x 8 1/2 x 1 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Hood Museum of Art Acquisitions Fund in honor of Mary Alice Kean Raynolds and David R. W. Raynolds, Class of 1949; 2008.66

 

Theresa Secord, American, Penobscot, born 1958
Sewing Basket with Needle Case and Pincushion, 2008
Brown ash, yellow cedar bark, sweetgrass, blueberry and raspberry dyes
Height: 5 1/2 in.; diameter: 10 7/8 in.
Purchased through the Hood Museum of Art Acquisitions Fund; 2008.68

Last Updated: 11/17/09