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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Recent Acquisitions 5

Europe; Greece; Greek
Skyphos handle and body sherd, possibly about 8th century BCE
Earthenware with black and red slip design
1 3/8 x 1 5/8 x 2 5/8 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.10

Europe; Greece; Greek
Closed body sherd with stripes, about 8th century BCE
Earthenware with brown banded slip design
1 3/8 x 2 1/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.11

Europe; Greece; Greek; Minoan
Bell cup rim with a dark bar, 17th-16th century BCE
Earthenware with black slip band at rim on interior and exterior
1 5/8 x 1 1/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.12

Europe; Greece; Greek; Roman Imperial
Lamp with vertical snake-head handle and helmeted head, 1st century CE
Red earthenware with overall black slip on exterior
1 7/8 x 4 in
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.13

Europe; Greece; Greek
Lamp with horizontal handle, possibly late 6th century BCE
Buff earthenware with black slip on exterior
3 1/2 x 1 3/8 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.14

Europe; Greece; Greek; possibly Roman Imperial
Mold-made lamp without handle with image of hippocamp, 1st century BCE
Earthenware with red slip
4 7/8 x 1 1/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.15

Europe; Greece; Greek; possibly Roman Imperial
Amphora, possibly 1st century CE
Earthenware
4 3/8 in. x 3 1/8 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.16

Europe; Greece; Greek; possibly Eleusis
Stele fragment with writing, 4th-5th centuries BCE
Marble stele fragment
4 3/8 in. x 2 3/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.17

Louis Emile Emmanuel Gillieron, Swiss, 1850-1924
Reproduction Mycenaean Relief decorated Shaft Grave Cup with Lions, late 19th-early 20th century
Metal
Overall: 4 x 5 1/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.18

Louis Emile Emmanuel Gillieron, Swiss, 1850-1924
Reproduction Gold one-handled Vaphio Cup with vertical Archaic fluting, late 19th-early 20th century
Metal
Overall: 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.19

Louis Emile Emmanuel Gillieron, Swiss, 1850-1924
Reproduction Gold Vaphio Cup with Scenes of Dolphins in Relief, late 19th-early 20th century
Metal
Overall: 3 1/2 x 5 3/4 in.
Gift of Ann B. Carter; 2007.50.20

Joyce J. Scott, American, born 1948
Mammy Under Undue Influence, 2007
Blown, cast and lampworked glass, beadwork (peyote stitch)
27 1/2 x 9 x 7 3/4 in.
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey 1958 Fund; 2007.51

A jewelry maker, sculptor, and performance artist, Joyce Scott challenges the canon of figurative sculpture, which historically was dominated by male artists and their tendency to monumentality, permanence, and grandeur. Scott's "reinvention of the bead as a material of critical sculptural and emblematic import" reveals her deep understanding of the use of beads in African cultures, especially as personal adornment and in sculptural symbolism. And yet her resurrected and updated "Mammies" are loaded with fierce interjections about American popular culture and satirical narratives steeped in racist ideologies.

Scott, who "believes in messing with stereotypes" and "prodding the viewer to reassess," uses her own sculptural satires to reveal the complex histories behind black motherhood in America, which she exposes through the surprisingly contemporary struggles of her sculpted "Mammy" personas. As Scott explains, "This Mammy speaks to the person trying to change herself from the core, so she might be whiter/prettier on the outside for society. The skirt is her skin as dressing, not so easily removed. Her desire to exchange her soul-self for a society-self shows how undue the influence is."

Parmigianino (Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola), Italian, 1503-1540
The Presentation in the Temple, about 1524-1530
Black chalk with pen and brown and black ink
15 5/8 x 10 in.
Purchased through the Florence and Lansing Porter Moore 1937 Fund; 2007.52

The art of Francesco Parmigianino was considered the most stylized and elegant in sixteenth-century Italy. It was also tremendously influential, inspiring developments throughout the peninsula for the rest of the century and helping to establish mannerism as an international style. The artist's 1971 catalogue raisonné contains over eight hundred entries and nearly two hundred listings documenting old copies of lost drawings and old reproductions (including prints). Given the enthusiasm for his drawings, there have been many additional discoveries since then. The present sheet was attributed to Parmigianino by David Ekserdjian in 1999. The Presentation in the Temple depicts the biblical episode (Luke 2:22-39) of Mary and Joseph bringing the infant Jesus to the temple in Jerusalem to be "consecrated to the Lord." The drawing is related to a chiaroscuro woodcut in the same direction, an impression of which was acquired by the Hood Museum of Art last year. The sheet may have been part a group of drawings by Parmigianino related to chiaroscuro prints now at Chatsworth, Windsor Castle, and the Uffizi.

Robert Scott Duncanson, American, 1821-1871
The Stone Bridge, 1851
Oil on canvas
10 x 16 in.
Purchased through the Florence and Lansing Porter Moore 1937 Fund; 2007.53

Robert Scott Duncanson is widely considered the first African American artist to gain international recognition. Born in upstate New York of a Scottish Canadian father and African American mother, Duncanson worked primarily in Cincinnati, the cultural and artistic center of the Midwest and a major center of African American culture. He began his self-instruction in the early 1840s by painting portraits and copies of prints, but soon focused increasingly on landscape painting. Duncanson benefited from the patronage of wealthy Cincinnati citizen Nicholas Longworth (a staunch abolitionist), who wrote a letter of introduction to accompany the artist on his 1853 trip abroad. By 1860 Duncanson was considered the best landscape painter in the Ohio River Valley and had earned enough income to own property and to finance additional trips to Europe, where he exhibited his work to favorable attention.

The Stone Bridge has a much more naturalistic quality than many of Duncanson's larger, more ambitious compositions, which are most often based on idealized or fantastic landscapes drawn from imagination. Its quiet palette and unspectacular subject suggest a familiarity with the changing landscapes aesthetics in the States and abroad, which he likely encountered in Longworth's extensive collection of European and American art.

Sana Musasama, American, born 1957
Yellowbird Bark, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, 1990
Ceramic (low fire), mixed media
Dimensions are variable
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey 1958 Fund; and the Kira Fournier and Benjamin Schore Contemporary Sculpture Fund; 2007.54.1

Sana Musasama, American, born 1957
My Hand, May Heart, Den Bosch, Holland, 1992
Ceramic (stoneware), mixed media
Dimensions are variable
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey 1958 Fund; and the Kira Fournier and Benjamin Schore Contemporary Sculpture Fund; 2007.54.2

Sana Musasama, American, born 1957
Outer Beauty, Inner Anguish, 2001
Ceramic
16 1/4 x 6 x 5 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey 1958 Fund; and the Kira Fournier and Benjamin Schore Contemporary Sculpture Fund; 2007.54.3

2007.55
Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie, American, Seminole, Muscogee, Dine, born 1954
Photographic Memoirs of an Aboriginal Savant (Living on Occupied Land), 1994
15 prints with text and photographic and cartoon reproductions, print and negative
11 x 14 in. (each print)
Purchased through the Contemporary Art Fund; 2007.55

Upon reaching her fortieth birthday, Tsinhnahjinnie realized her reflections on her family, political views, and life experiences in what has now become her signature piece, Photographic Memoirs of an Aboriginal Savant (Living on Occupied Land). The concept for this work came about one evening during dinner with a group of her "techie" friends. The idea arose to use yellowed and aged paper from the blank pages of old books, which she digitally assembled as an electronic diary "masquerad[ing] as a book." Tsinhnahjinnie and her friends appreciated the paradox that authenticity could be digitally created through the aged pages of a "non-existent book."

For this project, Tsinhnahjinnie filled fifteen vintage pages with photographs, illustrations, and typewritten text in the first person. Writing herself into the narrative of these "memoirs," she presents herself "the way that I see myself rather than being interpreted by others." Beginning on page "1954" (the artist's birth year), the book is filled with prose, images, strong emotions, and recollections that evoke the voices of her great-grandmother, grandmother, mother, and father, who pass down stories of strength, survival, endurance, and knowledge. Both image and text look inward to document moments and thoughts in Tsinhnahjinnie's life-childhood and family memories, high school, friends, experiences, and dreams-mingled with strong political statements that defiantly convey her personal convictions as a mature "Aboriginal savant." Within this sovereign space, she regains control over the visual, personal, and cultural narrative, where, as she states in the introduction to her "memoirs," the viewer can "journey to the center of an aboriginal mind without the fear of being confronted by the aboriginal herself."

peacefulserenity
Allan C. Houser, American, Chiricahua Apache, 1914-1994
Peaceful Serenity, 1992
Bronze plated steel
74 x 36 x 17 in.
Purchased through a gift from Mary Alice Kean Raynolds and David R. W. Raynolds, Class of 1949; 2007.56

Allan C. Houser (born to Sam and Blossom Haozous) was the first Chiricahua Apache child in his family born out of captivity in the twentieth century, after twenty seven years following the surrender of their leader Geronimo to the U.S. Army in 1886. Today, Houser is regarded as one of the century's most important Native American artists who played a pivotal role in the development of Native American modern and contemporary art. Following a thirteen year teaching career at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, Houser came to Dartmouth College as artist-in-residence in 1979. In the subsequent two decades of his life, he produced almost one thousand realistic and abstract sculptures. He became a major international figure in contemporary sculpture, known as a master of marble, limestone, slate, wood, cast bronze, and fabricated metals.

Houser's early drawings and paintings displayed the figurative and naturalistic style of the Indian art movement taught at the Santa Fe School and the University of Oklahoma in the early twentieth century. However, he soon developed a signature style that digressed from what was expected of "Indian" artists at that time by uniquely fusing Native American narrative themes with a streamlined modernist and often abstract sensibility. His open style of sketching and modeling explored the possibilities of pure form in evoking action, emotion, and relationship, more suggestive of three-dimensional art. These two-dimensional works inspired his later transition to sculpture, as did the work of the sculptors Brancusi, Arp, Lipschitz, and Moore in their play with positive and negative space. Peaceful Serenity, which captures the calm beauty of a mother and child figure. Each stands firm and proud, protective of the precious life cradled in their arms-a narrative motif evident in all phases of Houser's artistic career.

On October 7, 2007, President James Wright, the Native American Studies Program at Dartmouth College, and the Hood Museum of Art joined guests for the unveiling of the sculpture in front of the Sherman House.

Last Updated: 11/5/08