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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Recent Acquisitions 28

South America; Peru; Nasca
Bridge Spouted Figural Vessel in the Form of a Fish, 200-400 CE
Terracotta with polychrome slip
2 3/4 x 1 3/8 x 4 1/8 in.
Gift of Conny Landmann, in memory Fred Landmann; 2008.4.51

South America; Peru, Cupisnique
Fragmentary Relief of a Facial profile, 1000-200 BCE
Bone with polychrome
2 x 1 x 3/8 in.
Gift of Conny Landmann, in memory Fred Landmann; 2008.4.52

South America; Peru; Nasca
Miniature Jar with slip-painted Mythical Being, 200-400 CE
Terracotta with polychrome slip
2 1/8 x 3 x 3 in.
Gift of Conny Landmann, in memory Fred Landmann; 2008.4.53

South America; Peru; Nasca
Miniature Jar with slip-painted Birds, 200-400 CE
Terracotta with polychrome slip
1 5/8 x 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 in.
Gift of Conny Landmann, in memory Fred Landmann; 2008.4.54

South America; Peru; Nasca Style
Incised Cylindrical Vessel, 200 BCE-600 CE or modern (20th century)
Wood with dark and reddish pigment
4 1/8 x 1 x 1 in.
Gift of Conny Landmann, in memory Fred Landmann; 2008.4.55

South America; Peru; Nasca
Strap Handled Spouted Figural Vessel, 200-400 CE
Terracotta with polychrome slip
4 1/8 x 4 1/8 x 3 1/8 in.
Gift of Conny Landmann, in memory Fred Landmann; 2008.4.56

Unknown, American; New England
Small Basket with Handle, early 20th century
4 1/4 x 3 in.
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; 2008.5.1

2008.5.2
Unknown, American; New England
Miniature Basket, early 20th century
1 1/2 in.
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; 2008.5.2

2008.5.3
North America; Northeast; Eastern Woodlands; Penobscot; Passamaquoddy
Small Basket in the Shape of a Pitcher, late 19th century
Red dyed ash
4 1/4 x 3 1/8 in.
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; 2008.5.3

North America; Northeast; Eastern Woodlands; Passamaquoddy; Mohawk
Strawberry Shaped Basket, early 20th century
Dyed ash (brown or black)
4 1/4 x 3 1/8 in.
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; 2008.5.4

North America; Northeast; Eastern Woodlands; Penobscot
Basket Purse, late 19th century
Finely split ash
11 3/8 x 11 in.
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; 2008.5.5

Rick Bartow, American, born 1946; Northwest Coast; Wiyot
The Tale that the Crow Told, from the series The Ceremony that Never Was, 2006
Acrylic on panel
20 x 16 in.
Purchased through the Hood Museum of Art Acquisitions Fund; 2008.6.1

Rick Bartow, American, born 1946; Northwest Coast; Wiyot
No Dogs at the Ceremony, from the series The Ceremony that Never Was, 2006
Acrylic on panel
20 x 16 in.
Purchased through the Hood Museum of Art Acquisitions Fund; 2008.6.2

Rick Bartow, American, born 1946
The Dancers Arrive, from the series The Ceremony that Never Was, 2006
Acrylic on panel
20 x 16 in.
Purchased through the Hood Museum of Art Acquisitions Fund; 2008.6.3

Rick Bartow, American, born 1946; Northwest Coast; Wiyot
Acquiring a Taste for Crow, from the series The Ceremony that Never Was, 2006
20 x 16 in.
Purchased through the Hood Museum of Art Acquisitions Fund; 2008.6.4

2008.7
Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Cuban, born 1959
When I Am Not Here/Estoy Alla, 1996
Polaroid photograph
20 x 24 in.
Purchased in honor of Hugh Freund, Class of 1967, Class of 2008P; 2008.7

In this self-portrait, Cuban artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons has etched onto her skin the unnerving statement "Identity Could Be a Tragedy" to expose the potential pain or exuberance of negotiating through one's own hybrid identity as a black woman today:

Africa was my backyard . . . Africa was my mother, my grandmother, my uncle. It was everything that I knew, and that was a very rare feeling but almost a displaced feeling. When I arrived in Africa [in my forties], I was writing "can you ever return to a place you never left but where you have never been before?" At the same time, Cuba is very European and when I am in Europe I feel very much at home . . . when I am in Paris, I think "Havana!" All this sense of overlap and juxtaposition [causes] hybridity and fragmentation-a disparity of elements and culture. It is flamboyant to some extent. But Cuba is a very flamboyant place. It is exuberant in nature and by cultural construct. It is exuberant in the way that it thinks about itself: it is this tiny little island with pretensions that are much, much larger than what it actually is. Cuba takes up a lot of space in the imagination!--Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, artist, 2006

Senzeni Marasela, South African, born 1977
Baby Dolls, 2006
Six digital prints
16 1/2 x 23 1/4 in. each
Purchased through the Charles F. Vernick 1936 Fund; 2008.8

South Africa artist Senzeni Marasela fills her work with autobiographical references to a difficult and ambiguous mother-daughter relationship. As a child, Marasela was sent away to boarding school to be protected from the violence and atrocities experienced by many black South Africans during the apartheid regime. As the artist explains, "With the misfortune of my ‘privileged education' came the great depression of my childhood-my mother's absence." Initially, the mother-daughter relationship was disrupted when her mother migrated to Johannesburg to work as a domestic servant and was then later hospitalized on many occasions for schizophrenia and drug addition. This repeated separation from her mother contributed to the artist's lasting sense of loss, leading her down an artistic path in which she confronts the demons left by the void of a mother figure in her life.

In her series, Baby Doll, the artist presents the disturbing image of a woman-the artist herself-sitting on the grass dismembering a baby doll lying in her lap. The adult's action of dismemberment mimics a child's angry and aggressive posturing, further subverting the notion of the woman as caretaker and mother as nurturer. Marasela variously frames the doll in her lap, which evokes disturbingly real facial expressions such as trust, confusion, and fear. The artist's inserted and fragmented body evokes the partial presence and absence of the (doll's) caretaker. This visual mechanism of framing severs the viewer's ability to read her emotions and her relationship to the child figure evoked by the baby doll. The innocence and blind trust of the child in the hands of her caretaker is powerfully underscored by the final image of the abandoned and now completely disemboweled child.

Mary Cassat, American, 1844-1926
Meditation, 1882
Softground etching and aquatint, State I
6 1/2 x 8 1/8 in.
Purchased through the Olivia H. Parker and John O. Parker '58 Acquisition Fund and the Hood Museum of Art Acquisition Fund; 2008.9.2

Joseph Wright of Derby, English, 1734-1797, engraved by Valentine Green, English, 1739-1813
A Philosopher Shewing an Experiment on the Air Pump, 1769
Mezzotint
19 3/8 x 23 1/4 in.
Purchased through gifts from the Lathrop Fellows; 2008.10

P. Esmé Thompson, American, born 1946
Blue Divide, 2005
49 acrylic on metal panels
96 x 168 x 2 1/2 in.
Purchased through the William S. Rubin Fund; 2008.11

Blue Divide is a serial work that emphasizes both pattern and repetition. While its individual elements function as separate small paintings, they also work as parts of a larger whole, echoing and mirroring the works either adjacent to them or positioned similarly within the two overall chevrons that make up the composition on the wall. Thompson, a professor of studio art at Dartmouth, has always been interested in the ways in which painting and sculpture might intermingle, and she combines these media in ways that challenge their traditional boundaries. In Blue Divide, the tops of maple sugar buckets are covered with patterns inspired by a variety of sources including medieval illuminated manuscripts, textiles found in Renaissance painting, patterned glazes on ceramics, and those found in the natural world such as the honeycomb of a beehive.

Thompson writes, "My paintings and my installations are about the process of visual discovery. They demonstrate how memory can play a part in the way an image is revealed, not in a single iconic form, but through recognition and reconnections of repeated pattern and form . . .The repeated images create a cyclical and cumulative, rather than a linear, reading. The viewer is moved through the discrete parts of the painting, from panel to panel, by these multiple connections. The experience of continual movement is a journey that continues to unfold like an ongoing pattern of organic growth."

Varujan Boghosian, American, born 1926
James Joyce in Trieste, about 2004
Mixed media collage
10 ¾ x 7 ¾ in.
Gift of Virginia and Ellis L. Rolett; 2008.12

Unknown American, Boston, Massachusetts
Federal Eagle-inlaid and Figured Work Table, about 1805
Birchwood and mahogany
39 1/4 x 19 3/4 x 16 3/4 in.
Gift of Jerry Manne, Class of 1958; 2008.13

During the early years of the new republic, the patriotic symbol of an eagle often found its way onto interior furnishings-in three-dimensional form atop mirrors and case pieces, and pictorially on the inlaid surfaces of Federal-style furniture. An eagle's appearance here, however, on the highly specialized form of a lady's work table, is extremely rare.

Work tables or "pouch tables," as they were sometimes called, were fitted with fabric bags (this one is an early twentieth-century reproduction) designed to store a woman's unfinished needlework. As seen here, the bag is typically suspended from the lower drawer, which is open in the center. The top drawer is divided into compartments for sewing or writing implements. The table's gracefully tapering legs, canted corners, and overall symmetrical design reflect the neoclassical taste of the period as popularized in late eighteenth-century England.

Such specialized, even gender-specific, forms of furniture came increasingly into fashion as the American upper class expanded following the Revolutionary period. Like other maritime cities, Boston became a particular center of wealth. This table descended in the city's prominent Sears family.

Last Updated: 10/29/08