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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Recent Acquisitions 18

Bernard Childs, American, 1910-1985
Printing plate for "a, b, c", 1960
Zinc, engraved and cut with power drills, burns, files, burnishers, scrapers, saws, sandpapers, emeries, hand burins
9 11/16 x 9 7/8 in.
Gift of Judith Childs in honor of Anne and Robert C. Simpson, Class of 1953, Thayer 1954, Tuck 1954; 2007.85.1

Bernard Childs, American, 1910-1985
Trial Proof for "a, b, c", about 1960
Color power tool engraving with some traditional engraving, with black ink and touch of brown
9 13/16 x 9 13/16 in.
Gift of Judith Childs in honor of Anne and Robert C. Simpson, Class of 1953, Thayer 1954, Tuck 1954; 2007.85.2

Bernard Childs, American, 1910-1985
Trial Proof #10 for "a, b, c", March 6, 1960
Color power tool engraving with some traditional engraving, with turquoise and blue-black ink
19 3/4 x 20 3/4 in.
Gift of Judith Childs in honor of Anne and Robert C. Simpson, Class of 1953, Thayer 1954, Tuck 1954; 2007.85.3

Bernard Childs, American, 1910-1985
Trial Proof #17 for "a, b, c", March 7, 1960
Color power tool engraving with some traditional engraving, with transparent red violet ink
19 7/8 x 19 7/8 in.
Gift of Judith Childs in honor of Anne and Robert C. Simpson, Class of 1953, Thayer
1954, Tuck 1954; 2007.85.4

Mike Disfarmer, American, 1884-1959
Two young women in blouses, skirts and cinch belts, about 1940
Silver gelatin print
5 1/16 x 3 1/2 in.
Gift of Harley and Stephen Osman, Class of 1956, Tuck 1957; 2007.86.1

Mike Disfarmer, American, 1884-1959
Young woman in pinafore, puff sleeved blouse, and pearls, with striped background, about 1940
Silver gelatin print
4 3/4 x 3 3/16 in.
Gift of Harley and Stephen Osman, Class of 1956, Tuck 1957; 2007.86.2

Ouattara Watts, Ivory Coast, born 1957
The Ten Initials No. 1, 1992
Pastel and collage with mirror on paper
90 1/2 x 44 1/2 in.
Gift of Larry Sanitsky; 2007.87

Ouattara Watts shares his time between the urban environment of Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, the traditional setting of his hometown Korhogo in northern Côte d'Ivoire, and the international art worlds of Paris and New York. Quietly reflecting upon his African upbringing, spiritual sensibilities, and cultural heritage, Watts' work reveals his personal response to the transnational experience.

In 1977, Watts left Côte d'Ivoire to study art at L'Ecole des Beaux Artes in Paris, where in 1988 he met the internationally acclaimed African American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, who was immediately captivated by the spirituality and energy of Watts's paintings. Basquiat convinced Watts to move to New York, where they could pursue their shared goals of creating a visual language that blurred the boundaries between their diverse but interrelated art worlds. Under Basquiat's aegis and the legacy of their brief but intense friendship, Watts came of age in New York City as the first African artist to enter the elite ranks of the contemporary art world.

Watts's color sensibilities, use of found objects, and close relationship with the materiality of his art are closely aligned to abstract expressionism and the pivotal influences of Jackson Pollock, Cy Twombly, and Joseph Beuys during his formal training. However, Watt's use of recycled objects and natural pigments mixed with organic materials also connected his art to his Côte d'Ivoirian predecessors, who developed the Vohou-Vohou movement at L'Ecole des Beaux Arts d'Abidjan in Côte d'Ivoire between 1968 and the 1980s. The imagery in this and other examples of his earlier work allude directly to the esoteric knowledge of West African cosmologies, especially of his own Senufo culture and the Dogon peoples of Mali. Both the symbolism and rich earth tones point to Watt's own firsthand knowledge of African rituals of divination, healing, and initiation rites, which have had a lasting impact on his philosophical outlook in life.

Short Bull, Lakota (Brule), 1845-1915
Untitled (G1. Mounted warrior with horses), about 1885-90
Drawing media on ledger paper
7 3/4 x 10 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.1

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G2. [PA-8517] Mounted warrior spearing fleeing white man w/ beard), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 3/4 x 11 1/2 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.2

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G2. [PA-8517] Pinto horse led by woman w/umbrella), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 3/4 x 11 1/2 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.3

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G5. p. 169), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 1/2 x 11 3/8 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.4

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G5. p. 170), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 1/2 x 11 3/8 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.5

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G6. p. 139), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
4 7/8 x 11 7/8 in
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.6

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G6. p. 140), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 7/8 x 11 3/4 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.7

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G7. p. 57), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
4 7/8 x 10 7/8 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.8

Vincent Price Book Warrior, Cheyenne, Arapaho
Untitled (G7. p. 57/58), about 1875-80
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 7/8 x 11 3/4 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.9

Old White Woman, Cheyenne
Untitled (G3. p. 69), about 1887
Drawing media on ledger paper
7 3/8 x 11 3/4 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.10

Old White Woman, Cheyenne
Untitled (G4. p. 27), about 1887
Drawing media on ledger paper
7 1/4 x 11 3/4 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949; 2007.88.11

Frank Henderson, Arapaho (1862-1885)
Untitled (G8. p. 158), about 1882
Drawing media on ledger paper
5 1/4 x 11 7/8 in.
Gift of Mark Lansburgh, Class of 1949, in honor of Barbara Thompson; 2007.89

Nina Katchadourian, American, born 1968
Norton Christmas Project 2007, 2007
Salt and pepper shakers [glass and metal] with white and black particulates in fluid
Each shaker: 3 5/7 x 1 7/8 in.
Gift of the Director of the Hood Museum of Art; 2007.90

basket
Pam outdusis Cunningham, American, Penobscot, born 1971
Fancy Basket, 2007
Brown ash, sweetgrass
5 x 9 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Alvin and Mary Bert Gutman '40 Acquisition Fund; 2007.91

The Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac, and Maliseet tribes of Maine are known as the Wabanaki Indians, or "People of the Dawn." For hundreds of years, the Wabanaki have excelled at basketry woven from sweet grass and thin strips from the brown ash tree called splints. Despite various methods and styles used in this labor intensive art, Wabanaki baskets have clearly thought-out designs that juxtapose shape, color, line, texture, and form. Today, there are mainly two types of baskets: work baskets, which were used historically for gathering, storing, and transporting goods, and so-called "fancy baskets," such as this example, with decorative and innovative design elements that especially appealed to non-Natives consumers in the late 1800s.

Belonging to the younger generation of Maine basket makers today, Pam outdusis Cunningham continues to bring innovative changes to this long-lasting tradition of native basketry, which includes traditional and contemporary renditions of berry and acorn baskets, sewing baskets, handkerchief baskets, and honor baskets, among others. According to Cunningham, "I love every aspect, every step of my basket making. I relish the fact that, in most ways, I am following in the footsteps of my ancestors. Many of the oldest and simplest traditions continue, from splitting and gauging fiber from the ash tree, to hand weaving each basket, to picking sweetgrass and then braiding it, for weaving into my baskets."

basket
Fred Tomah, American, Maliseet, 20th century
Fancy Basket, 2007
Natural and dyed brown ash
10 3/4 x 9 3/4 in.
Purchased through the Alvin and Mary Bert Gutman '40 Acquisition Fund; 2007.92

Fred Tomah is a master basket maker from the Houlton Band of the Maliseet Tribe whose reservation is located in Northern Maine just outside the town of Houlton in the county of Aroostook. The Maliseet, a federally recognized Indian tribe, is culturally part of the larger group of the Wabanaki nation, including the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, and the Aroostook Band of Micmac's. The Maliseet art of basket making-as also other Wabanaki tribes of the Eastern Woodlands-includes clearly thought-out design, juxtaposing shape, color, line, texture and form.

As in many contemporary Native basket makers from Maine, Tomah was taught by his ancestors and has been making brown ash baskets for over forty years. This new genre of Eagle's Nest basket is one of more than twelve styles of baskets that Tomah makes using brown ash wood that he gathers and later splits himself. Tomah's baskets are made of natural and dyed brown ash (originally the dyes were made from natural sources but more recently synthetic dyes are used). The labor intensive preparations of the natural materials include gathering suitable logs of brown ash; pounding, separating, gauging, and smoothing the ash sticks into splints; then finally dying, weaving, twisting, and pinching the materials into the various complex shapes, forms, and designs, that give value to the baskets as both an art and a traditional craft. Tomah modifies traditional utilitarian basket forms by incorporating chairweave techniques to create a new generation of decorative baskets that combine older techniques with newer aesthetic sensibilities.

 

Last Updated: 11/5/08