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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Exhibitions 2007

Cap12
Installation of El Anatsui: GAWU.

Cap13
Installation of Thin Ice: Inuit Traditions within a Changing Environment.

Cap14
Installation of Our Land: Contemporary Art from the Arctic.

Cap15
Installation of Pilobolus Comes Home: Three Decades of Dance Photographs.

Cap16
Artist Subhankar Banerjee speaks to a Dartmouth class in front of the installation Subhankar Banerjee: Resource Wars in the American Arctic.

Cap17
Wenda Gu working on the installation of united nations: the green house, Baker Library, Dartmouth College

Cap19
Installation of Resonance and Inspiration.

From Discovery to Dartmouth: The Assyrian Reliefs at the Hood Museum of Art, 1856–2006

October 19, 2006-March 11, 2007
Gutman Gallery

The year 2006 marked the passage of a century and a half since the arrival at Dartmouth College of one of its most prized possessions in the realm of art and culture: the Assyrian reliefs, currently on display in the Kim Gallery of the Hood. Originally part of the decorative scheme of the so-called Northwest Palace of King Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BCE) in Nimrud, Iraq, these six large-scale reliefs depict a ritual performance undertaken by the king among both human and supernatural beings. A special installation about the reliefs and other ancient Near Eastern works from the collection was on view in the Hood and included special interactive three-dimensional computer reconstructions by Learning Sites, Inc., presenting the reliefs in their original contexts.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, and was generously funded by the Bernard R. Siskind 1955 Fund and the Cissy Patterson Fund.

El Anatsui: GAWU

January 6-March 4, 2007

El Anatsui, a Ghanaian-born artist who has lived in Nigeria for the past thirty years, uses found objects to celebrate Africa's rich artistic and cultural heritage. Beyond their aesthetic value, Anatsui's focus on recycled materials also comments upon the continent's broader concerns, particularly the adverse effects of globalization, consumerism, and waste in Africa today. In his series of metal "tapestries," Anatsui literally transforms trash into awe-inspiring objects of beauty that convey a sense of hope and cultural renewal. An illustrated catalogue accompanied the exhibition.

The presentation of this Oriel Mostyn Gallery touring exhibition at the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, was generously funded by the George O. Southwick 1957 Memorial Fund and the Hansen Family Fund.

"I liked the art because they're just old rusted cans but the artist noticed them and decided to turn such unnoticeable materials into noticed artwork."--Images student

Thin Ice: Inuit Traditions Within a Changing Environment

January 27-May 13, 2007

The impetus for this exhibition, which focused on the Hood Museum of Art's Inuit collections and celebrates Dartmouth's long involvement in Arctic Studies, was the International Polar Year 2007-2008. Thin Ice explored traditional Inuit life through the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century art and artifacts that indigenous Arctic peoples used to survive within this challenging environment. With the understanding that the Arctic environment is undergoing rapid transformation from climate change and the significant melting of sea ice, the exhibition highlighted the impact of such change on Inuit ways of life and their relationship to the region in which they live. An illustrated catalogue accompanied this exhibition.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College as part of International Polar Year and generously funded by the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Foundation, the Kane Lodge Foundation, the Ray Winfield Smith 1918 Fund, and the Leon C. 1927, Charles L. 1955, and Andrew J. 1984 Greenebaum Fund.

Our Land: Contemporary Art from the Arctic

March 27-May 20, 2007

This exhibition featured about sixty works from the important Nunavut Territorial collection of contemporary Inuit art, which celebrates the growth of Inuit creative expression over the past five decades. The works reveal how longheld Inuit artistic traditions inspire contemporary sculpture, prints, fiber arts, photography, and digital media that reflect Inuit societal values of family, community, and worldview as expressed through Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit ("traditional knowledge"). Materials such as stone, antlers, and animal skins are transformed into bold expressions of the inner and outer worlds of the Inuit, encompassing spirituality, seasonality, cosmology, identity, and place. The exhibition was presented by the Hood in recognition of International Polar Year, and was accompanied by an illustrated catalogue.

This exhibition was organized by the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts, and the Government of Nunavut, Canada. Its presentation at the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, was generously funded by the Philip Fowler 1927 Memorial Fund and the William Chase Grant 1919 Memorial Fund.

Subhankar Banerjee: Resource Wars in the American Arctic

March 27-May 20, 2007
Lathrop Gallery

This installation of four monumental photographs by Subhankar Banerjee of the American Arctic shows breathtaking landscapes that are also rich in bird and animal wildlife. Banerjee has been an advocate--both through his art and by lecturing around the world--for the prevention of oil and gas drilling in this region, particularly the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Teshekpuk Lake and its surrounding wetlands, and the Kasegluk Lagoon.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously supported by the Ray Winfield Smith 1918 Fund, and the Leon C. 1927, Charles L. 1955, and Andrew J. 1984 Greenebaum Fund. 

Pilobolus Comes Home: Three Decades of Dance Photographs

March 27-July 8, 2007
Harrington Gallery

Pilobolus Dance Theatre, founded by four Dartmouth students in 1971, has changed the course of contemporary dance through its signature style of closely combined bodies and its radically innovative approach to collaborative artistic creation. Dartmouth celebrated Pilobolus's recent donation of its remarkable archives with a residency, performances, educational programs, and an exhibition at the Hood of stunning photographs chronicling thirty-five years of the company’s work. A brochure accompanied the exhibition.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, and generously funded by the Harrington Gallery Fund. 

Wenda Gu: united nations: the green house and united nations: united colors

Site-Specific Installation in Baker Library’s Main Hall
June 6-October 28, 2007

Wenda Gu: forest of stone steles: retranslation and rewriting tang dynasty poetry

Hood Museum of Art
June 6–September 9, 2007

The Hood Museum of Art and Dartmouth College Library presented a two-part installation and exhibition by avant-garde Chinese artist Wenda Gu. Spanning the hundred-foot long main hall in Baker Library, united nations: the green house was created from hair collected in 2006 from over forty thousand Dartmouth College students, faculty, and staff and Upper Valley community members. It, and united nations: united colors are the latest in the artist's fourteen-year global conceptual human hair series. Wenda Gu's hair sculptures grow from his dream that through his art he might unite humanity and encourage international understanding. An exhibition of the artist’s recent works on paper was presented concurrently in the Hood’s galleries. A catalogue is forthcoming in Spring 2008.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, in partnership with the Dartmouth College Library, and generously funded by a grant from the LEF Foundation, the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund, the Eleanor Smith Fund, and the George O. Southwick 1957 Memorial Fund.

American Art at Dartmouth: Highlights from the Hood Museum of Art

June 9-December 9, 2007

American art has long been a mainstay of Dartmouth College’s collections, beginning with a gift in 1773 of a Boston-made silver bowl from Royal Governor John Wentworth to Dartmouth's founder, Eleazar Wheelock, in honor of the College’s first commencement. The largest selection of the American collections ever presented at the Hood, this exhibition showcased over 150 paintings, sculptures, pieces of silver, and other decorative arts to 1950. Artists represented include Paul Revere, John Singleton Copley, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Doughty, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, Frederic Remington, Willard Metcalf, Maria Oakey Dewing, John Sloan, Augusta Savage, Paul Sample, Maxfield Parrish, and Georgia O’Keeffe. An illustrated catalogue copublished with the University Press of New England accompanies the exhibition.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, and generously funded by the Bernard R. Siskind 1955 Fund, the Hansen Family Fund, and the Leon C. 1927, Charles L. 1955, and Andrew J. 1984 Greenebaum Fund, and a generous gift from Jonathan L. Cohen, Class of 1960, Tuck 1961.

Resonance and Inspiration: New Works by Magdalene Odundo

June 30, 2007-January 20, 2008
Gutman Gallery

This exhibition presented recent vessels and drawings by Kenyan-born ceramic artist Magdalene Odundo. Reflecting the technical and conceptual influences of an artist who lives abroad and has studied in England, India, and Nigeria, Odundo's work is inspired by millennia of vessel-making from all over the world. Her lustrous thin-walled vessels are so difficult to make that she completes only a few each year. An illustrated catalogue accompanied this exhibition.

Organized by the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida. The presentation at the Hood Museum of Art is generously funded by the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund.

Last Updated: 10/15/07