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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Exhibitions 2006

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Still frame of Alfredo Jaar's The Eyes of Gutete Emerita.

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Artist Serge Hambourg presents a public gallery talk in the installation Protest in Paris 1968: Photographs by Serge Hambourg.

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Installation at the Hood of Dreaming Their Way: Aboriginal Australian Women Painters.

 

 

Coaxing the Spirits to Dance: Art and Society in the Gulf of Papua New Guinea

April 2-September 17, 2006
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
October 24, 2006-December 2, 2007

This exhibition explored the relationship between social life and artistic expression in one of the most important art-producing regions of Papua New Guinea. It presented one hundred objects from the Hood’s own important collection of Melanesian art, including the Franklin Family Collection, and select other public and private collections. Objects included magnificent ancestor boards, masks, drums, skull racks, and personal items from four regions of the Papuan Gulf. This exhibition was accompanied by a catalogue distributed by the University of Washington Press.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, in collaboration with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. It was generously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, Marcia and John Friede, the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund, the Philip Fowler 1927 Memorial Fund, the William Chase Grant 1919 Memorial Fund, and the Eleanor Smith Fund. Curatorial research for this project was funded in part by the Claire Garber Goodman Fund through the Department of Anthropology at Dartmouth College.

Rembrandt: Master of Light and Shadow; Etchings from the Collection of the Hood Museum of Art

April 8-September 17, 2006

In honor of the four hundredth anniversary of Rembrandt’s birth, the Hood Museum of Art exhibited its thirty-six etchings and drypoints by the most inventive and original printmaker of all time. Rembrandt thought about printmaking in new ways, offering the viewer not only carefully finished masterpieces but also more roughly sketched glimpses into his artistic processes. Throughout his career Rembrandt continued to devise solutions to the problem of depicting light and dark with the printed line. The Hood Museum of Art’s collection of Rembrandt etchings spans his life’s work, providing an overview of thirty years of his evolving ideas about printmaking. This exhibition was accompanied by a brochure.

 Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, and generously supported by the Bernard R. Siskind 1955 Fund and the Cissy Patterson Fund.

Globalization in Ancient Costa Rican Arts

February 25-October 8, 2006
Gutman Gallery

Although the ancient Costa Ricans built no great architectural structures, they left behind a rich artistic legacy in ceramic and stone. This exhibition presented a selection of vessels and figures that helps us trace relationships between the peoples of Costa Rica and their neighbors north and south. In ancient Costa Rican cultures, these objects were used to teach about mythology, religion, and the environment. Today, they help archaeologists reconstruct ancient paths of trade and distribution. The exhibition was guest curated by Fred Lange, an archaeologist of Central American cultures, and accompanied by a brochure.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, and is generously funded by the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund.

Alfredo Jaar: The Eyes of Gutete Emerita

July 8-September 3, 2006
Harrington Gallery

The Eyes of Gutete Emerita by filmmaker and photographer Alfredo Jaar grew out of his visit to Rwanda a few months after the 1994 genocide. This photo-based work, which combines images and text, focuses on the suffering of one individual, Gutete Emerita, who lost her husband and two sons in the mass killing of Tutsis at a church forty miles south of the capital of Kigali. Jaar chose not to photograph the remains of bodies still lying on the ground at the massacre site and instead directs our attention to the survivors who must live with the memory of what they saw.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art and generously supported by the Harrington Gallery Fund.

Protest in Paris 1968: Photographs by Serge Hambourg

September 9-November 19, 2006
Harrington Gallery

French photographer Serge Hambourg's work provides an eyewitness account of the events of May and June 1968 in Paris, when student and worker strikes against the political and social establishment brought the country to a standstill. Barricades went up, arrests were made, and street fighting and other violence roiled France during a time of similar protests around the world. The thirty-six photographs in this exhibition depicted protesters marching in the streets of Paris as well as the reactions of bystanders and opposition members loyal to the government of President Charles de Gaulle. An illustrated catalogue accompanied this exhibition.

Organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, and was generously funded by the Parnassus Foundation/ Jane and Raphael Bernstein.

Dreaming Their Way: Aboriginal Australian Women Painters

October 7-December 10, 2006

This exhibition presented prime examples of what has been one of the greatest contemporary art movements of the late-twentieth- and early-twenty-first centuries--works on canvas and bark by thirty-three Indigenous Australian woman artists who live in small, remote communities throughout the continent. Women have driven it and have given much to their communities by preserving traditions, passing on cultural knowledge, and providing economic support for their people. An extraordinary range of painting styles was represented by approximately sixty works made in many parts of Australia, including Arnhem Land, the Kimberly, the Torres Strait Islands, and the central deserts. The intensely colorful canvases and extremely intricate paintings on bark draw upon ancient stories--or Dreamings--and symbols, as well as each artist's deep connection to the land. An illustrated catalogue accompanied this exhibition.

Organized by the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. Its presentation at the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, was generously funded by the George O. Southwick 1957 Memorial Fund, the Marie-Louise and Samuel R. Rosenthal Fund, and the William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. Hall Fund.

"I have been to see this exhibition three times and I am so thankful it was brought to Dartmouth. I also brought my eight year old son and two of his classmates. They were very engaged and insightful . . . and brought the book to Thetford Elementary to share with their classmates."--Lynn White Cloud, Assistant Dean, Director of Fellowships and Internships, Tucker Foundation

Last Updated: 10/16/07