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Hood Museum of Art
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
603.646.2808
hood.museum@dartmouth.edu

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Recent Acquisitions 12

Frederick Douglas Ledger Artist, Cheyenne, 19th century
Untitled (Drawing #55), about 1865
Pen, graphite, colored pencil on paper
Sight: 7 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.
Purchased through the Robert J. Strasenburg II 1942 Fund and the Julia L. Whittier Fund; 2007.26.1

The mounted warrior in this drawing carries a distinctive forked implement, a histahevikuts or vikuts (heart bladder) and a decorated shield, both identifying his membership in the Bowstring Society, a Southern Cheyenne warrior society. The warrior's shield is painted with a tri-partite design, including a crescent at top center toward which run red and black parallel lines. These symbols identify him as belonging to the Hiseometaneo band (Hill or Ridge people) of the Southern Cheyenne. The shield features also two green full moons on a red background, divided by a white, central band with the green crescent moon at top against a band of yellow. A narrow trailer of leather is attached to the top of the shield, to which are laced four tiers of golden eagle feathers. Although this trailer hangs down across the face of the shield, the artist has shown us part of the design at top, in x-ray fashion, to identify the warrior’s affiliations. Two black lines, probably connoting speed, decorate the left hip of the warrior's horse, whose tail has been wrapped in red cloth in battle fashion.

Frederick Douglas Ledger Artist, Cheyenne, 19th century
Untitled (Drawing #57), about 1865
Pen, graphite, colored pencil on paper
Sight: 7 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.
Purchased through the Robert J. Strasenburg II 1942 Fund and the Julia L. Whittier Fund; 2007.26.2

Here the mounted warrior, presumably the same as in drawing #55, is adorned with typical Cheyenne accoutrements, including a hairpipe breastplate, the long Cheyenne style red wool breechclout, leggings fringed with red trade cloth selvedge, and a long strip of German silver/nickel discs flowing from his scalp lock. Some of his accoutrements further indicate his membership in the Bowstring Society, such as the straight war lance decorated with eagle feathers and red and green trade cloth and the feathered and painted shield, which is also adorned with the crescent moon of the southern Cheyenne bands. The moon was considered to be protective against death--the green shield connotes the green tinged thunder clouds of springtime, which shower the land with pale-green hailstones, bringing forth new life. The shield also displays painted bear claws, most likely the black bear which was used as a symbol of the Southern Cheyenne Hevataneo band (also known as the hair-rope band--named for the soft lariats they braided from buffalo hair). The war shield has a band of red wool cloth stitched around the circumference, and to this are attached eagle feathers. In this drawing too, the horse’s tail has been wrapped in red trade cloth wrapped, ready for war.

On StageHilaire Germain Edgar Degas, French, 1834-1917
On Stage III, 1876-77
Soft-ground etching, drypoint, and roulette
5 x 7 in.
Purchased through gifts from the Lathrop Fellows; 2007.27

The acquisition of the first Degas print to enter the collection, On Stage III was one of only four prints published during the artist’s lifetime. It was created for an exhibition sponsored by Les Amis des Arts de Pau, a town in southern France, where he had several friends. The etching reveals Degas’s exploration of a favorite early vantage point at the Opéra, the center seats behind the orchestra pit, and his perceptions of the richly layered scene of musicians, dancers, and stage. The present impression of the fifth state of On Stage III was printed outside the edition published for the Pau exhibition catalogue. Although this is not one of the rarest prints made by the artist, the present impression was selected for the exhibition and illustrated in the accompanying, landmark catalogue of 1984, described as one of seven "representative examples of this state" in the world.

Simon Tookoome, Canadian / Inuit, born 1934
The World of Man and the World of Animals Come Together in the Shaman, 1974
Stonecut and stencil print
24 7/8 x 32 15/16 in.
Purchased through a gift from the Friends of Hopkins Center and Hood Museum of Art; 2007.28

This shamanistic transformation from a person into a bird relates man and animal to each other; humans and other creatures share the same substance, and shamans retained the mythological ability to pass between the two states of being. The hoof of a caribou and shapes of dogs also animate this figure, whose face is formed of two different profiles.

Howard Ben Tre, American, born 1949
Kira’s Benches, 2007
Bronze and glass
Height: 20 3/8 in. each; diameter irregular
Commissioned by the Hood Museum of Art through the Kira Fournier and Benjamin Schore Sculpture Fund; 2007.30.1-6

An internationally recognized artist, Howard Ben Tré makes large-scale abstract sculptures that fuse glass and bronze into one form. In honor of the late Kira Fournier, the Hood Museum of Art commissioned Ben Tré to create these six benches for the museum's galleries. Each piece has an opposite in shape and configuration among the six. This interest in complementary forms and materials relates to the artist's continuing exploration of the male and the female in his work.

Robert "Spooner" Marcus, American / Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo (formerly San Juan Pueblo), 20th century
Evergreen, 2007
Blown glass
15 x 5 in.
Purchased through the Contemporary Art Fund; 2007.31

Ronald Norman Sherr, American, born 1952
James A. Larimore, Dean of the College, 1999-2006, 2007
Oil on panel
26 x 20 in.
Commissioned by the Trustees of Dartmouth College; 2007.33

Pompeo Batoni, Italian, 1708-1787
William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth (1731-1801), 1753-56
Oil on canvas
37 1/2 x 28 1/2 in.
Purchased through gifts from Jane and W. David Dance, Class of 1940, Tuck 1941; Jonathan L. Cohen, Class of 1960, Tuck 1961; Frederick B. Whittemore, Class of 1953, Tuck 1954; Barbara Dau Southwell, Class of 1978 and David Southwell, Tuck 1988; Parnassus Foundation/Jane and Raphael Bernstein; and an anonymous donor; 2007.34

Pompeo Batoni was an acclaimed portrait painter in Rome who created iconic images of late-eighteenth-century British travelers. William Legge, like many aristocratic Englishmen of this era, deferred the start of his professional and political career for the opportunity to broaden himself through travel and the acquisition of foreign languages on the European Grand Tour. His correspondence indicates that during his travels through the continent from 1751 to 1754 he absorbed lessons from antiquity through the writings of classical authors on Roman history, visited sites where important events had transpired, and studied and collected sculpture and other artifacts. Batoni's portrait of Lord Dartmouth, who succeeded his grandfather to the title in 1750, was first owned by the sitter's mother, Elizabeth Kaye, Countess of Guilford, and has remained in her family since it was painted. The portrait was begun during Lord Dartmouth's sojourn in Rome in 1753 when he was accompanied on the trip by his stepbrother, Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford, (1732-1792), later prime minister during the period of the American Revolution. After traveling through Germany and northern Italy they reached Rome in January 1753, where they stayed in the Casa Guarnieri. Soon afterwards both were painted by Batoni, whose portraits in oil were preceded by miniatures (now lost) dated the same year. The painting of Lord Dartmouth was completed three years later (1756) and shipped to England. It is one of the finest portraits of the benefactor who would later become the principal supporter of Eleazar Wheelock's Indian Charity School. Lord Dartmouth met Samson Occom in 1766 who had been the first Native American student at Wheelock's school in Connecticut and had been sent to England to raise funds. Lord Dartmouth became president of the Board of Trade in 1765 and Secretary of State for the colonies in 1772. He became Lord Privy Seal in 1775 and finally left Lord North’s government in 1782, after a brief period as Lord Steward of the Household.

Nobuyoshi Araki, Japanese, born 1940
Untitled "Bondage (Kinbaku)," 1988/2005
Gelatin silver print
34 x 41 cm
Purchased through the Anonymous Fund #144; Selected by Dartmouth College students who participated in the Hood Museum of Art Seminar Museum Collecting 101: Zachary P. Dorner, Class of 2008, Claire M. Dunning, Class of 2008, Celeste Griffin-Churchill, Class of 2007, Kathryn J. Hagy, Class of 2008, Gina Lee, Class of 2008, Lisa Moon, Class of 2008, Marissa A. Slany, Class of 2008, and Sherry S. Zhao, Class of 2007; 2007.35

Nicholas Galanin, American / Tlingit, born 1979
What Have We Become? Vol. 3, 2007
Book made of blank white pages with face of the artist cut out of it
3 x 17 x 11 1/8 in.
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey '58 Fund; 2007.36.1

Nicholas Galanin, American / Tlingit, born 1979
What Have We Become? Vol. 5a, 2007
Cut pages from the book Under Mount Saint Elias
4 1/2 x 3 5/8 x 8 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Virginia and Preston T. Kelsey '58 Fund; 2007.36.2

WhatNicholas Galanin, an emerging Tlingit artist, constructs enigmatic sculptures of masklike faces from blank sheets and pages from nineteenth-century anthropological books as part of a series of paper sculptures addressing the politics of cultural representation and contemporary indigenous identity. The materiality of the sculptures is significant to him. Commenting on the outsider’s perspective of Tlingit culture, Galanin notes, "I have found myself reading Western literature, often written from a foreign perspective, in which my culture has been digested and recycled back to me." Galanin, who recognizes the importance of literature as documentation, is also overtly conscious of its biases in presenting "a dilemma in which old and new, customary and non-customary, overlap and collide. It is at this point of collision that a new dynamic and tension is being negotiated."

 

37.1

Zig Jackson, American / Mandan / Hidatsa / Arikara, born 1957
China Basin District (Entering Zig's Indian Reservation), number 2 of 4, negative: 1997; print: 1997-1998
Gelatin silver print
14.3 x 17.8 in.
Purchased through the Harry Shafer Fisher 1966 Memorial Fund; 2007.37.1

 

Victor Masayesva Jr., American / Hopi, born 1951
Ground Zero, negative 1998; print 2007
Epson pigment print
17 x 22 in.
Purchased through the Harry Shafer Fisher 1966 Memorial Fund; 2007.37.2

Ground ZeroVictor Masayesva Jr., who grew up on a Hopi Reservation in Hotevilla, Arizona, incorporates Hope symbolism into his photography to depict the ruptured balance between humans and nature. Using antlers, flower petals, feathers, snake skins, cornstalks, and bones as visual metaphors for the cycle of life and death, Masayesva juxtaposes the destruction of humans, animals, land, and spirit against the reality of regeneration, life, and beauty in the southwestern landscape. Ground Zero, which is part of the artist's larger series of digital and hand-painted photographs called Nuclear Reservations, explores apocalyptic visions of universal concerns seen through the lens of Hopi cosmology and its connection to the land. In the photograph Masayesva links the threat of nuclear annihilation with natural disasters such as great storms and unpredictable weather patters to comment on the role of global affronts in human and environmental destruction.

Alice Cling, American / Navajo, born 1946
Untitled, 2006
Terracotta
7 x 7 1/2 in.
Purchased through the Julia L. Whittier Fund; 2007.38

39.1Thomas Rowlandson, British, 1756-1827
Published by W. Humphrey, London
Money Lenders, 1785
Etching, printed in bistre, with handcoloring
10 x 10 1/4 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.1

 

John Raphael Smith, British, 1751-1812
Published by John Bowles, London
Miss Macaroni and Her Gallant at a Print Shop, 1773
Mezzotint
14 x 10 3/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.2

Robert Laurie, British, 1755-1836, after a painting by J. C. Seekaz, possibly German, 18th century
Published by Robert Sayer, London
A German Print Merchant, 1772
Mezzotint
Plate: 13 13/16 x 10 in.; sheet:14 3/4 in. 10 3/4 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.3

A. Albanesi, possibly Italian, 18th century
Afternoon's Amusement, 1777
Etching with handcoloring
11 3/8 x 15 5/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.4

Giles Grinagain (pseudonym), British, active early 19th century
The Caricaturist’s Apology, 1801
Etching with handcoloring
Sheet: 8 7/8 x 10 7/8 in
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.5

Thomas Rowlandson, British, 1756-1827; after George Moutard Woodward, British, about 1760-1809
Tail Piece to Volume Three, not dated
Etching in bistre with handcoloring
16 x 20 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.6

John Raphael Smith, British, 1751-1812
Published by John Bowles, London
Miss Macaroni and Her Gallant at a Print Shop, 1773
Mezzotint
14 1/8 x 10 3/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.7

39.8

François-Robert Ingouf, French, 1747-1812 after Sigmund Freudeberg, Swiss, 1745-1801
The Itinerant Merchant (Le Négociant Ambulant), 1777 (after a design of 1770)
Probably etching and engraving
Sheet: 11 1/8 x 12 3/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.8

 


Joe Lisle, British, active about 1830
British Classics: The Spectator/Very Fond of Prints and a Drawing-Master, 1830
Etching and aquatint with handcoloring
10 x 6 7/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.9

P. Roberts, British, active about 1810
There’s Nothing Like a Friend to Give a Man a Lift in the World, about 1805-15
Etching with handcoloring
8 5/8 x 7 7/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.10

Unknown, British
Honi Soit Qui Maly Pense (Evil Be To Those Who Think Evil), not dated
Etching
12 1/8 x 16 7/8 in.
Purchased through the Adelbert Ames Jr. 1919 Fund; 2007.39.11

Last Updated: 11/5/07